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PMINJ 2000 Symposium Speakers 

14th Annual Symposium

22 May 2000

Parsippany - Sheraton Tara

Introduction
Agenda
Speakers
Posters
Sponsors


Speakers


Speaker Topic
Keynote Speakers
Randy Englund Creating an Environment for Successful Projects
Rod McNealy
Making Customer Satisfaction Happen: A Strategy for Delighting Customers
Track Speakers
Walter Antonell
Success Tips for Large Scale Projects
Clifford Bernstein
Challenges of E-Commerce Projects
Carol Brennan
Managing Software Projects: A Level 5 Perspective
Luis Cabassa
PM Role in the Pharmaceutical Industry
Michael Clark & Rick Holmes
Managing Team Involvement
Peter Egan
VisualProject Demo for the MS Project User
Greg Githens
How to Align Projects with Strategies
Robin Goldstein & William Matthews
Tools & Techniques for R&D Projects
Gary Heerkens
The Art of Managing Management
Jonathan Japka
Primavera Project Planner for the Enterprise (P3e)
S. Kandaswamy
Using the Monte Carlo Method to Assess Risk
Paul Koehler
Being a PM in a Non-PM Environment
Thomas Marron
Scheduling in an R&D Environment
John Shea
Integrated Resource & Project Management
Mark Stout
PM for the E-Millennium using Project Scheduler
Dora Tarver
PM Methods for Internet Projects

PMINJ
              Symposium

Walter Antonell

Bio:
Walter is President of TechLabs, Inc., holds an MBA and is a prior Fortune 100 executive, with hands on experience in major corporate transformation projects. He is a blue chip consulting executive, lecturer and developer of courseware for the AMA and a member of Who's Who.
His consulting experience spans major corporate transformations as a Director with KPMG, Cap Gemini and BA&H.

Mr. Antonell served for 12 years as the COO of Bantam, Double Day, Dell Publishing Group, Inc. He developed the strategic plan and executed the successful integration of Bantam, Double Day, Dell Publishing Group, Inc., encompassing publishing entities in excess of $1 billion, meeting all profit, schedule and budget objectives. He eliminated more than $40 million in costs, closed and sold three Double Day distribution facilities and consolidated three New York office locations into one. He also converted systems to the Bantam, Double Day, Dell cluster, moved 100 million books into a combined facility with no interruption in services and met sales unit budget the first year. This propelled Bantam, Double Day, Dell, Inc. into the number one position in fulfillment.

As corporate vice president for Citibank, Mr. Antonell led the Advanced Technology Group, responsible for today's ATM machines. He developed and installed an on-line project monitoring process controlling $100 million in systems development. He also established and managed corporate control and interface with all Citibank groups for the technology management functions, as well as MIS strategies for all Citibank groups.

As corporate vice president of logistics/systems for Xerox Corporation, Mr. Antonell`s major project responsibilities included installation of the corporate distribution system requiring two hour response time for over 37 thousand tech reps.

As vice president of operations (COO) Mr. Antonell directed Olivetti's acquisition of Underwood Corporation and transformed it into Olivetti of America.

Topic:

Success Tips for Large Scale Projects

Abstract:

Even a very talented, very experienced Project Manager, with lots successful projects behind him, probably harbors a secret fear that on any given day, their boss can come out of his office with a new project, the biggest, most important project that the organization/company has ever undertaken. Of course there will be a lot at stake counting on the project being a major success. And of course it will come with very sketchy requirements, perhaps a negotiable budget, but already have a pre-publicized very ambitious completion date. And it will be big. Perhaps, it will be an acquisition, or a major restructuring. It will need the best Project Manager possible to make it happen. Who will the boss assign this critical project to? He'll look to his most talented most experienced Project Managers. He'll look to you to take this on.
Suddenly, you have a matrixed project team of over 100 members, and deliverables and dependencies across numerous organizations in the company, and lots of management visibility. Where do you start? How do you organize? How do you keep this much breadth under control?

This is the type of Project that grabs headlines in the news.

The Focus of This Presentation
The focus of this presentation is how do you take charge of this huge project with so many people, organize it, control it and make it happen on time, within budget and meeting or exceeding stakeholders objectives.

This presentation is for senior level experienced Project Managers that understand "project management" concepts. It is a practical "how to" approach with techniques used in successful large-scale projects including Mergers and Acquisitions.

It will also include a listing of success tips and a "Best Practices" view of how to proceed. The life cycle of the process, organization, planning/scheduling requirements and project control techniques will be highlighted.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Clifford Bernstein

Bio:
 
Mr Clifford M. Bernstein is a Senior Consultant and Project Manager with the Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) Consulting Group. He has built a reputation as both a manager of timely, cost-effective business application delivery, and as a planner who incisively identifies business needs and creative solutions. His subject matter expertise is in the healthcare, software product development and manufacturing environments. His experience encompasses more than 25 years of program/project management, software development, business analysis, and strategic and technology planning for various Fortune 500 companies in the US, Europe, Latin America and Asia.

Mr. Bernstein played multiple roles while at Exxon including Manager of Software Technology for Exxon Corporation's 500 operating organizations and as Chief Information Officer for their Brazilian Computing Operations. He also served as Vice President for Software Development at the Magna Software Corporation. As Director of Advanced Technology for the IBM and Baxter partnership in healthcare information systems and vertical clinical systems, he integrated their product lines and assisted in their achieving profitability. While consulting at Lucent Technologies, he project managed the electronic commerce implementations for the sales organization.

Mr. Bernstein has a BS in Mathematics from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and an MS in Mathematics from New York University.

Topic:

Challenges of E-Commerce Projects


Abstract:

  None available

PMINJ
              Symposium

Carol Brennan

Bio:
Carol Brennan is the Vice President and General Manager of the Quality and Operations Center at Telcordia Technologies, Inc. where she is responsible for corporate quality. Carol has twenty-two years of experience with Telcordia in the areas of quality strategy, policy and implementation, and software application development, including design, development, testing, performance, maintenance, and customer support. Carol earned her BS and MS in Applied Mathematics from Florida State University. She is a member of Quality New Jersey, American Society for Quality and is an active member of the Telephone Pioneers Organization. 

Topic:

Managing Software Projects: A Level 5 Perspective

Abstract:

Ms. Brennan's presentation will begin with a brief description of the CMM(R),developed by the Software Engineering Institute of Carnegie Mellon University, and a high-level review the Key Process Areas included within the framework. A transition into the Telcordia Technologies journey to level five of the CMM, including activities undertaken that were the key contributing factors to the successful level 5 assessment will follow. A review of the Telcordia Quality Management System, highlighting some of the project management functions which make it work, will be included. Ms. Brennan will wrap up with a sharing of key learnings from the Telcordia experience along with a question and answer session.

CMM is a registered trademark of Carnegie Mellon University.


Luis Cabassa

Bio:
Luis A. Cabassa, PMP, is currently a Manager of Regulatory Affairs with Aventis Pasteur. Luis has served in the pharmaceutical and biologics industries for nearly 20 years and has experience in the areas of Project Management, Operations Management, Materials Management, Purchasing, Supply Chain Management, Quality Control, Quality Assurance and Regulatory Affairs. During his career, he has worked with such companies as Warner-Lambert, Bristol-Myers Squibb, MOVA Pharmaceutical and Aventis Pasteur. Luis has managed projects in the areas of technology, transfers, research and development of new drugs, pharmaceutical facilities construction, validations, business development and strategic planning. Luis holds a BS degree in Microbiology from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, an MBA specializing in Industrial Management from the Inter American University and is currently conducting studies towards a master's degree in Project Management from George Washington University. In addition he is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute and is also a Certified Purchasing Manager by the National Association of Purchasing Management (NAPM).

Topic:

PM Role in the Pharmaceutical Industry

Abstract:

Corrective and preventive action of nonconformances is an important part of a quality system. Regardless of whether the quality system is based upon an ISO, cGMP or TQM framework, corrective and preventive action is a fundamental aspect of any system and a continuous improvement mindset.

In the healthcare products industry, it is clear that the expectation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is that compliance issues are identified and resolved. The regulatory enforcement risks are high when they are not. Warning Letters are routinely issued to firms for not getting at the root cause of problems, as well as the lack of timely closure.
The project management professional plays a critical role on corrective action teams. The tools of the trade of the project manager often make the difference in whether issues are truly resolved. This presentation makes the case for the value-added contribution of the project management professional and need to ensure that this is provided for in the regulatory strategy of a firm.


Michael Clark

Bio:
 
Michael Clark is a Senior Manager within Modem Media's Internet Customer Service Solutions consulting practice. His primary focus is providing strategic council to large organizations whose strategy includes building superior customer loyalty through digital and web-based technologies. A significant amount of his work involves translating strategic vision into actionable project based initiatives.

Mr. Clark's consulting experience spans both the manufacturing and service sector. Some of his prominent clients include: Eastman Kodak, Chase Bank, Merck, Bayer, Delta Airlines, Johnson & Johnson, and Lockheed Martin.
Prior to joining Modem Media, Mr. Clark worked with Kepner-Tregoe as a Senior Consultant responsible for analyzing organizational work processes and studying high performance project management environments. He also facilitated executive decision-making sessions and the design of complex new product development plans.

Previously, Mr. Clark worked at CIGNA Property & Casualty Companies, Inc. as a Senior Loss Control Specialist. In this capacity, Mr. Clark was responsible for protecting the assets of major commercial insurance risks in the Eastern U.S. His manufacturing experience also includes time as a Production Manager for Mid-Island Non-Ferrous Foundry Corporation in New York.

Mr. Clark received his M.B.A. in Management/Organizational Behavior with a concentration in Corporate Strategy from New York University. He holds a B.S. in Industrial Technology from State University of New York College at Buffalo. Mr. Clark is an active member of Project Management Institute (PMI), the American Society for Quality (ASQ), and is a frequent speaker at national and local conferences. Recently, he was a featured speaker at the 1999 PMI National Seminars & Symposium in Philadelphia

 
Rick Holmes

Bio:
 
Rick Holmes is the Director of Kepner-Tregoe's Strategic Project Management Practice. His primary focus is on strategy implementation, new product development, project portfolio management and complexity reduction efforts. He also assists organizations to build enterprise-wide expertise in decision-making and business process improvement.
Over the last ten years, Mr. Holmes has consulted with clients in a variety of industry settings worldwide, including Hallmark International, the Industrial Development Agency of Ireland, Corning, WL Gore and Johnson & Johnson.

Mr. Holmes writes, speaks and conducts research on various Strategic Implementation and Project Management topics. The subject of some of his research will be reviewed at the Conference Board's Project Management Forum this coming June in New York City.

Mr. Holmes received his B.S. in Information and Decision Sciences from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a focus on Operations Management and Management Information Systems.

Topic:

Managing Team Involvement


Abstract:

The most popular question asked in business is, what are the qualities of a good leader? This question used to be asked frequently in project management circles until the software wave overwhelmed the profession. The failure, however, of PM software to create successful Project Managers has brought us back to the old question. The human component of project management is returning. This paper reveals research and an approach to applying leadership skills that have not been previously applied within the project management profession. The session will also help us to determine the skills and styles of very effective leaders.
What is there in common in the make-up of Vince Lombardi, Martin Luther King, Colin Powell? The pursuit of some common style among this diverse array of people would be a futile one. They have employed different approaches, possessed different strengths, appealed to different groups. In fact, the worst place in which to look in seeking a successful approach to leadership is in the personality of a successful leader. This is especially relevant in organizations that are requiring more and more employees to take on project management roles. The presence of visible "leadership traits" wanes as organizations sink deeper into their talent pools for project managers. Organizations then find themselves in the position of having to develop leaders from within their ranks.

Peter Egan

Bio:
                                     

Topic:

VisualProject Demo for the MS Project User

Abstract:

VisualProject will provide a multi-media presentation of our innovative graphical technology highlighting the drag-and-drop interface for the planning, modification and reporting of project plans. The productivity enhancement add-ins of this product facilitating data-entry and communications through visual processing of diagrams will be discussed. The demonstration also includes VisualProject's interactivity with MS Project.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Randy Englund

Bio:
Randall L. Englund (Randy) is an internal consultant and project manager at Hewlett-Packard Company. He is a member of the Project Management Initiative team whose purpose is to lead the continuous improvement of project management across the company. Drawing on experiences in project management, marketing, field service, and manufacturing, he leads workshops and facilitates project management practices with product developers. Although Randy completed an MBA in management at San Francisco State University and a BS in Electrical Engineering at the University of California, his real education came while managing large projects at HP and General Electric. Together with cultural anthropologist and consultant Robert J. Graham, Randy co-authored the book Creating an Environment for Successful Projects: the Quest to Manage Project Management (Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1997). Randy is a former director for the Product Development and Management Association (PDMA), a member of the Project Management Institute (PMI), author of several articles, frequent speaker and seminar facilitator, and an advisor for the Strategic Management Group.

Topic:

Creating an Environment for Successful Projects

Abstract:

Project work is fast becoming a majority of the work performed in modern organizations. Development and launch of successful new products and services hinges on forming a thoroughly integrated "project-based organization" (PBO). The objective is to achieve greater results from projects selected and underway in the organization. This requires management to understand the what, how and why of developing project management as an organizational competency. Upper managers have a great deal to do with project success. However, project support is much more than just sending people off for training.
This presentation covers essential components-the pieces of a large puzzle-drawn from experience, that become necessary to create an environment for successful projects.

Important steps include:
  • clear goals and upper management support for a PBO
  • developing an upper management team to oversee the project management effort
  • linking each project to organizational strategy
  • understanding sources of anxiety that inhibit getting results
  • organizing to reward project management
  • supporting core teams
  • aligning projects with customers
  • developing a project management information system
  • developing a project manager selection and development process
  • installing a project review process to learn from project experiences
  • supporting an ongoing project management initiative in the organization
Managers are more effective when they learn best practices in project management and how to support those practices. Develop an organic organization that stresses accountability for the success of the whole, authenticity and integrity in action, and an internal market model for deploying resources. Examples demonstrate how these practices are accomplished in major corporations such as Hewlett-Packard, including an integrated model for linking projects to strategy.

Former HP CEO Lew Platt provides impetus to manage project management by stating "Crisp execution of projects is critical to the survival of today's organizations...An imperative facing HP managers as well as our partners is to create an environment where the projects that we choose are successful. This [presentation, based on Graham and Englund's] book provides important guideposts for that quest."

PMINJ
              Symposium

Greg Githens

Bio:
Gregory D. Githens, PMP, has a special interest in the strategic relationship of projects and programs to organizational performance. He is a popular speaker and has presented at seven PMI symposia as well as a dozen other project management conferences. He has published articles in PMNetwork and is a regular columnist on Program Management for the Product Development Management Association. Greg is a past member of the PMI Standards Committee and is currently a member of the revision team for the new exposure draft of A Guide to the PMBOK. He is also a certified New Product Development Professional, as awarded by the Product Development & Management Association. Greg is Managing Partner of Catalyst Management Consulting and has extensive experience across a number of industries in building alignment of projects and programs with organizational strategies.

Topic:

How to Align Projects with Strategies

Abstract:

Is your project management process clear on how to deliver value to key strategic initiatives? This session provides a step-by-step approach to linking projects and programs into strategy-aligned portfolios. You will learn about:
  • Recognizing the classic mistakes that organizations have made in building prioritization strategies and examine the state of the art in information technology and new product development projects
  • Defining three types of IT portfolios and why each one is prioritized, justified, and managed differently
  • Determining requirements for the strategic planning process
  • Building stakeholder buy in
  • Eliminating "popcorn priorities" in projects that lead to constant and unproductive organizational churn
Drawing from experience, as well as Dilbert and the Far Side, this presentation is pragmatic, thought-provoking, and lively. Don't miss it.

Robin Goldstein


Bio:
 
 Robin S. Goldstein, Ph.D. is currently a Project Leader in Global Project Management at Novartis Pharmaceuticals and is responsible for leading a cross-functional team dedicated to early development projects in 3 therapeutic areas: (1) Cardiovascular, metabolic, and endodrine; (2) arthritis and bone metabolism; and (3) antiinfectives. Prior to her appointment as Project Leader in 1997, she was a Director of Experimental Toxicology at Sandoz (1994-1997), Assistant Director of Toxicology at SmithKline Beecham (1990-1994) and Associate Senior/Senior Investigator at SmithKline (1983-1990). Robin received her Ph.D.at Michigan State University and received postdoctoral training at the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology.

 
William Matthews

Bio:
 
                                       .

Topic:

Tools & Techniques for R&D Projects


Abstract:

Dedicated cross functional teams, with representatives from Research, Toxicology, DMPK, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Development, Clinical Pharmacology, Early Phase Commercial Development and Project Management, have been established at Novartis with the objectives of (1) managing projects from early Research through Proof of Concept (PoC) in man, (2) elaboration of therapeutic area strategies and (3) evaluation of in-licensing opportunities. A fundamental tenet of this concept, referred to as PRIDE (Proof of Research in Development), is to: 1) optimize selection of NCEs for further development, 2) rapidly develop compounds to test PoC, and 3) improve the attrition curve in late development.

Project management tools are critical in providing an analysis of strategic options for Early Development projects. One example of the utility of Project Management tools is the analysis of development options for an integrated strategy for a lead molecule (Drug A) and its backup (Drug A1) . Using Project Management tools, an integrated strategy for both projects identified limited development plans with a common strategic decision point, allowing selection of the best molecule to proceed for further development with relatively limited investment. Data to support this strategic decision included PoC data in man for this class of molecules, evaluation of PK/PD relationships for Drug A and Drug A1, and studies addressing other technical issues (e.g., chemical stability, toxicology).

Another example illustrating the utility of Project Management tools is the identification of critical/non-critical path activities for Drug B and the potential costs-savings achievable by deferring non-critical path activities. Drug B is being developed for rheumatoid arthritis and has a novel mechanism of action. One of the Early Development options evaluated focused on minimizing development costs until PoC was established in Phase IIA in patients, given the novel (and unproven) mechanism of action of Drug B and relatively higher risk in development.. By identifying and deferring non-critical path activities to after PoC was established, Early Development costs were reduced by approximately 2 mio CHF with no impact on overall project timelines. In this way, Project Management tools provided an effective means to identify non-critical path activities and thus, limit the investment in Early Development until the compound "proved" its clinical potential.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Gary Heerkens

Bio:
Gary R. Heerkens, PMP, PE is a consultant, trainer, lecturer, and author in the field of Project Management. He is the president of Management Solutions Group, a Rochester, New York based company which specializes in providing Project Management educational solutions and organizational development support.

Prior to founding Management Solutions Group, Gary managed a wide variety of project types and sizes for the Eastman Kodak Company for over 20 years.  He also served as staff assistant to the Director of Project Management at Kodak, where he designed and taught several project management training programs, helped develop Kodak’s capital project process methodology, and acted as an internal project management consultant across the company.

In addition to teaching and consulting, Gary serves on the Editorial Board of the Successful Project Management Newsletter and served on the review committee for PMI’s A Framework for Project Management Seminar. He is a PMP, a licensed Professional Engineer in New York State, and is currently in his second term as president of the Rochester Chapter of PMI. He holds BSME and MBA degrees from the Rochester Institute of Technology.

Topic:

The Art of Managing Management

Abstract:

Project managers are continually "offered" direction and feedback from various members of management. Unfortunately, these encounters can sometimes be very unpleasant, difficult to deal with, or personally challenging; some may be unexpected, others unwelcome. Some may be rooted in misinformation about you or your project, and others may simply be inappropriate in nature. At the same time, however, most project managers recognize and acknowledge the need -- and the importance -- of maintaining a healthy working relationship with all management stakeholders. It follows, then, that effectively managing the management interface will naturally include the ability to effectively deal with these inevitable difficult situations.

Accordingly, this paper will focus on and address two critical questions:
  1. What can project managers do to decrease the probability of encountering difficult situations?
  2. What can project managers do when faced with difficult situations?
We'll begin by examining which members of the management ranks may be likely to provide direction or feedback to project managers, noting that this group could include management representatives that some project managers hadn't even considered. We'll continue by describing and defining the nature of these encounters -- in particular, what factors give rise to their existence, and what makes them so difficult to handle.
We will explore the question of why managing the management interface is vital to a project manager's future, the effects of not taking the appropriate action(s), and a caution not to be manipulative in the way they handle the management interface.

Then - in a very practical, "how to" manner - two potential solution sets will be offered: the first is a list of specific actions that project managers can take which are aimed at reducing the chances that these situations will occur. These are largely suggestions on how to manage the management interface on a day-to-day basis. The second solution set offers project managers several practical tips on how to deal with difficult and challenging situations when they do occur. This aspect is treated as a series of suggestions aimed at conditioning the project leader to react in certain ways when confronted with certain specific, difficult situations. The objective is to help project managers learn how to act - and react -- in ways that will enable them to more effectively manage the management interface.

Jonathan Japka

Bio:
                                      

Topic:

Primavera Project Planner for the Enterprise (P3e)

Abstract:

See how to manage your entire Project Portfolio with Primavera Project Planner for the Enterprise (P3e). A typical Pharmaceutical Company will be used to demonstrate the power of the software. Using a single database, all the needs of an organization can be met, from summary reporting to the CEO, to time writing by a Lab Technician. No consolidation is ever required.
Integration of Research, Clinical trials, Manufacturing, Marketing, and Regulatory Affairs timelines will be demonstrated. Viewing and managing resource requirements across all Divisions of the company will also be shown. Learn how to manage all your timelines in a simple straight-forward manner.

PMINJ
              Symposium

S. Kandaswamy

Bio:
S. Kandaswamy (Kanda) is a Principal Technical Staff Member at AT&T. He has over 12 years of experience with the company. His current assignments include: Network and Capacity Planning for the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) network and Performance Monitoring. He has led a Task Force of Telcordia, RBOCs, and Independent Telco network administrators and switch engineers and modified the Telcordia's LSSGR on Traffic Measurements. He received the "CIO/CTO Circle of Excellence Awards" from the Vice President of Consumer Communications Service, AT&T, for setting the standards for the long distance network.

S. Kandaswamy obtained his PMP certification in 1999. He has worked as a Project Manager in several companies before coming to AT&T. He has a bachelor's and master's degree in Mathematical Statistics from India. Also, he received his Ph.D. in Systems Technology from the Indiana University. He has published articles in journals and presented papers in the area of capacity planing and evaluation.

Topic:

Using the Monte Carlo Method to Assess Risk

Abstract:

The objective of this presentation is to encourage the use of Monte Carlo Simulation in risk identification, quantification, and mitigation especially in the areas of project scheduling and cost control. PMBOK states that traditional mathematical analysis techniques such as the Critical Path Method (CPM) and the Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) tend to underestimate project durations and strongly recommends that simulation should be used on any large or complex project. Many project managers are either unaware of this very valuable tool or mistaken in their belief that this methodology is too complicated to use.

To illustrate the principle behind Monte Carlo simulation, the audience will be presented with a hands-on simulation. Selected groups of audience will be given directions to generate task duration numbers, randomly, for a simple 4-task project. This will be replicated, say five times, so there are five runs of data. Results from each iteration will be used to calculate the earliest completion time for the project and the audience will identify the tasks on the critical path for each iteration.
Then, a computer simulation of the same 4-task project will be shown, using a commercially available tool. At the end of these exercises, the audience will be able to appreciate the insight offered by the simulation. They will learn that the earliest project completion time, yielded by the traditional methods, is too optimistic. They will also find out that tasks on the critical path could vary from one simulation run to another.

The presentation will be targeted towards a beginner (novice user) and so it will be at a basic level. Audience is not expected to know anything about any simulation methods.

Once the underlying principle behind the Monte Carlo Simulation is understood, hopefully, project managers will feel comfortable to use one of many commercially available packages for risk identification, quantification, and mitigation.

The presentation will provide:
  • The rationale behind the use of Monte Carlo Simulation
  • A hands-on simulation experience for a 4-task fictional project
  • Results from a computer-simulation for the same 4-task fictional project
  • A list of key inputs to a simulation model
  • Guidelines in the selection of distribution models
  • A walk-through of another Microsoft Project with Monte Carlo Simulation
  • A list of selected reference articles
  • An opportunity for questions and answers.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Paul Koehler

Bio:
Mr. Koehler is an independent consultant with over ten years of experience leading domestic and international technology projects in the financial industry. Prior to starting his project management consulting business Mr. Koehler spent eight years with CSK Software in New York City, a software and services firm specializing in trading room systems technology. His most recent role with the firm was Director of Fulfillment for North America.

Mr. Koehler is a Certified Project Management Professional (PMP) and a strategic partner of Sun Microsystems Professional Services organization.
For questions or other inquiries you can contact Mr. Koehler via email at .

Topic:

Being a PM in a Non-PM Environment

Abstract:

Through my 10 years managing technology projects in the Wall Street industry, I have rarely found a client that performed technology projects using formalized project management methodologies. In these fast-paced, competitive, and often chaotic environments the emphasis is placed on starting the execution phase immediately and racing to deliver, often juggling multiple priorities along the way. Using brute force and long hours some of these projects succeed, while others fail.

Managing a complex cross-functional technology project within budget and on time in this environment can be an enormous challenge. When in this situation, a critical success factor is getting the client to understand, and buy-in to a project management process. Obtaining this 'buy-in' can sometimes be a project within a project, and is critical to the success of the endeavor. A project, or at least the PM, is doomed if the client sponsor and key project team members do not see value in using a project management process. If the project proceeds haphazardly, the project manager becomes nothing more than a gantt charting expediter.

How does the project manager gain client acceptance of the fundamental project management approach while keeping the overall project well planned and on course? Reflecting on my experience managing projects in chaotic environments this article will suggest solutions to this two-fold challenge.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Thomas Marron

Bio:
Tom Marron has fourteen years experience managing projects in various capacities. While performing a variety of project planning and scheduling functions Tom developed an expertise in the Primavera suite of products. Prior to founding Schedule Solutions, he served as an authorized Primavera trainer and lead consultant. There, he began focusing on applying project planning to pharmaceutical projects. He implemented master planning tools for Non-Clinical Development, Clinical Development and Facilities Planning. Tom also gained five years of utility project planning experience with ABB and another four years in large construction management projects with Turner Construction. Mr. Marron holds a bachelor's degree in civil engineering.

Topic:

Scheduling in an R&D Environment


Abstract:

          

speaker

Rod McNealy

Bio:
Rod McNealy is Director of Customer Driven Quality at Johnson & Johnson (J&J) Health Care Systems Inc. where he is responsible for implementation of Total Quality Management and serves as a "value-added" resource to hospital customers on the subject of Quality Implementation. Rod's twenty-five year business career has centered on the fields of marketing, market research, strategic planning, and Quality Improvement. Rod has been with J&J since 1978. Prior to joining J&J, he worked for Procter & Gamble in Brand Management. Rod has consulted with companies in the United States and internationally. Rod is the author of two books - Making Quality Happen, and Making Customer Satisfaction Happen. Both are published by Chapman & Hall, London. Rod graduated from Princeton University with a Bachelor's Degree in American History. He received his Masters in Business Administration from the Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration.

Topic:

Making Customer Satisfaction Happen: A Strategy for Delighting Customers

Abstract:

Customer Satisfaction is THE critical strategic advantage for any enterprise, regardless of industry. Satisfied customers are your most valuable resource - are you doing everything possible to retain them?

  • Do you know the 5 to 10 year financial value of each of your top ten customers?
  • Do you know what percent of your current customers is "delighted" and what percentage is "looking for the door"?
  • Can you quantitatively rank and weight the needs and expectations of your major customer segments?
  • Do you know who in your organization comes in the most frequent contact with your customers and what actually transpires in these "Moments of Truth"?
The Keynote presentation by Roderick M. McNealy will address the need to focus management on the importance of the customer and their power to "make or break" organizations. The presentation will focus on customer satisfaction as a strategic approach, not a tactical measurement exercise. The goal is to have organizations adopt customer satisfaction as their primary strategic focus. World class organizations clearly understand this and that learning must be translated throughout organizations.

John Shea

Bio:
                                     

Topic:

Integrated Resource & Project Management

Abstract:

This presentation is a discussion of the integration of different management roles into the project management process including Project Managers, Functional Managers and Resource Managers. Particular emphasis will be placed on their roles in the IT environment.

Mark Stout

Bio:
                                    

Topic:

PM for the E-Millennium using Project Scheduler

Abstract:

Scitor is presenting PS Suite, the latest generation of its powerful Project Scheduler set of tools. PS8 is the first project management tool to manage projects in either the traditional Critical Path methodology, or Critical Chain in one package. PS8 also generates multiple websites of your project management data. You can easily generate specific websites targeted towards your Executive Management, another for your resources and yet another for your customer. PC-Inform is a web-based tool for your resources to view their assignments and report back their progress. Rounding out PS Suite is PC-Objectives, a corporate objectives management system, and PSI, a seamless interface to SAP R/3.

speaker

Dora Tarver

Bio:
Dora Tarver, MS, is a Managing Partner at e-ProjectManagers.com. She has over 13 years in Information Systems and Software Development including 6 years leading and participating in Internet projects. Other IS experience is in analysis, design, development, and project management in industries such as Banking, Insurance, Beverage, Telecommunications, Financial, and Utilities.

Topic:

PM Methods for Internet Projects

Abstract:

Current or future Internet project managers: learn how to apply your project management skills to Internet projects by first understanding the differences between web-based and traditional IS projects. In the presentation, we explore five areas in which Internet projects present particular challenges to a project manager. We then provide the project management processes that can be applied to meet these challenges and to bring your Internet project to success.

This presentation will enable project managers to appropriately adapt and apply conventional project management processes to Internet projects. It will explore perceived and actual differences between Internet and traditional IS projects and will explain how these differences can be managed.


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