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PMINJ 2001 Symposium Speakers 

15th Annual Symposium

07 May 2001

Parsippany - Sheraton Tara

Introduction
Agenda
Speakers
Posters
Sponsors
Photos


Speakers


Speaker Topic
Keynote Speakers
J. Davidson Frame PhD, PMP
Breaking Murphy's Law: Surviving the Odyssey
Lou Russell
Treat the Whole Patient - Systemic Project Management Improvement
Business Leader
Roundtable Discussion
Track Speakers
Eoin Callan PMP
Get Empowered without Getting Overpowered
Bruce Chadbourne PMP
Risk Management Training Wheels
Linda W. Colin
Effective Management of Project Issues
Jerry Hill for
Larry Lambertsen

Developing a Project Office
Jim Huntington PMP
Gain Ten Free Hours a Week
Ginger Levin
Metrics for PM Improvement
Michael Mah
Managing the Three-headed Dragon: Risk, Defects & Deadlines
Paula Martin
Be a Sadistic Facilitator
Rita Mulcahy PMP
Successful PMs
Paul Royer
How Healthy is your Program?
Aita Salasoo PhD, PMP
How to Manage Projects "In the Boonies”
Kelly Slone PMP
Staying Afloat - Noah's Top Ten PM Strategies

PMINJ
              Symposium

Eoin Callan, PMP

Bio:
Eoin J.P. Callan, MBA, PMP, has witnessed firsthand the practical application of disciplined project management for well over a decade on thousands of projects. Mr. Callan has extensive international business experience as well, having lived and worked in over a dozen countries.

His business experience includes industrial expertise with call centers large and small, financial services firms, direct mail efforts, pharmaceutical companies, software development, market research ventures, medical research, journalism/public relations, and training. His clients have ranged from one-person start-ups to Fortune 500 giants. He has performed schedule and contract administration on multiple projects and has managed global project teams, some as large as several dozen people with multimillion-dollar budgets.

Other specific accomplishments include leadership of the first successful effort in the United States to fully automate e-mail communications with a legacy system, implementation of contract review processes worth millions in savings, training of over a thousand people in several different subjects (including project management, software usage, foreign languages, and SAT preparation) and winner of multiple customer service awards from multiple employers.

Mr. Callan holds a B.A. in international relations and a B.A. in journalism from Lehigh University and an M.B.A. with an international management focus from the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He is also certified as a Project Management Professional (PMP) by the Project Management Institute.

Topic:

Get Empowered without Getting Overpowered

Abstract:

Communications between humans have always been important in achieving project success. Throughout history, improvements in technology have brought forth changes in communication methods and channels, changes that have impacted society and project management on many levels. Technological change comes faster and faster today, resulting in a whirlwind of new communication devices and mechanisms with which project management practitioners must contend. In today's world, project management may be synonymous with communication management.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Bruce Chadbourne

Bio:
 
Bruce C. Chadbourne, PMP is a 25-year veteran of Engineering Project Management, spanning service in Nuclear Engineering as a U.S. Navy line officer, followed by systems and software engineering projects with GE Aerospace and Lockheed Martin. For the last five years Bruce has been responsible for developing proejct office and risk management discipline in his company. His paper "To the Heart of Risk Management" was published in PMI '99. He now serves on the Risk SIG as Director of Region I "Eastern Americas" and is an instructor of Project Management Certificate programs for Boston University Corporate Education Center.

Topic:

Risk Management Training Wheels


Abstract:

Do not rely on PMBOK alone for everything you need to know to practice effective risk management. One of the simplest steps you can take is to set up a data base to maintain your project risk information. Here is some practical, tested, and economical advice.

The failure of project organizations to establish a meaningful risk management mindset has been a recurring theme of the Risk Management papers from recent symposia. Yet frequently the experts fail to mention the central importance of a simple risk data base. Such a "tool" serves to collect and maintain information that preserves the collective memory on the details of each risk facing the project and the project office. Why navigate the Project Management Rapids in a risk management canoe if you intend to leave the paddle ashore?

PMINJ
              Symposium

Linda W. Colin
AT&T PM

Bio:
Linda Colin is a Project Manager at AT&T. Her 12+ years of Project Management experience spans projects across several functional areas within AT&T, including Provisioning, Customer Care and Billing. In 1994, she was credited with co-leading the definition of a Project Management Methodology for a software development organization supporting billing for AT&T's high-end customers. Bell Labs assessed the Project Management Methodology as leading edge and later achieved the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) Capability Maturity Model certification of level 2.

She has a MBA degree from Strayer University, in Washington D.C., where she completed her thesis work on Project Management Planning and Scheduling Techniques. She received her Master's Certificate in Project Management from the Keller Graduate School of Management.

Topic:

Effective Management of Project Issues

Abstract:

Many of today's projects are complex and span organizational lines. They are often so complex, issues prohibit the Project Manager's ability to plan and manage the project's work breakdown schedule. With key personnel and organizations geographically disbursed, how can the Project Manager effectively manage issues to keep the project on track?

This presentation is focused on an Effective Issue Management Methodology that enables the Project Manager to work with project teams to identify, manage, and resolve issues that arise throughout the project life cycle. The methodology combines Process and Technology - enabling the entire project team to effectively communicate and mange project issues.

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J. Davidson Frame
Professor and Dean of Academic Affairs at the University of Management and Technology

Bio:
David Frame is Academic Dean at the University of Management and Technology. He is a widely published author and has written a number of business best sellers in project management, including Managing Projects in Organizations, The New Project Management and The Project Office. His most recent work, Project Management Competence, examines how the new challenges presented by project management demand a re-thinking of the competencies needed by effective project workers, teams and organizations.
David was PMI's Director of Certification from 1990 through 1996. He was PMI's Director of Educational Services in 1997 and 1998. He currently sits on PMI's 14-person Board of Directors.

David was Professor of Management Science at George Washington University from 1979 until 1998, where he was department chair and established GW's project management program. He has worked with leading project-based organizations for twenty years, including AT&T, Lucent, NCR, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, Westinghouse, EDS, Sprint, Marriott, Fannie Mae and the Department of Defense.

Topic:

Breaking Murphy's Law: Surviving the Odyssey

Abstract:

Project management is undergoing a rapid transformation. Not long ago, project managers were mere implementers of solutions handed to them. Today, they must function as business people and look beyond the technical aspects of the job. Organizations themselves are conducting their affairs primarily through projects, so they too must re-think how best to carry out their work to accommodate the new emphasis on managing by projects.

Dr. J. Davidson Frame's presentation takes a look at what it takes for individuals, teams, and organizations to successfully navigate today's project management odyssey. His comments are based on his experiences with leading project-based organizations in the US and abroad, including AT&T, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, Sprint, SITA, ABB, Roche Diagnostics, and Nokia. The presentation focuses on key issues facing individuals and organizations today, including:
  • The evolution of project management roles: From mere implementers to business decision-makers
  • The quest for competency: Assessing competency at the individual, team, and organizational level
  • Project support offices: The new stovepipe?
  • Today's project management toolbox: What's hot, what's not

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Jim Huntington PMP
AT&T Global Network Project Management

Bio:
Jim Huntington is a Program and Project Manager for AT&T Global Network in Lake Mary, Florida. He has a Master of Business Administration in Technology Management degree from the University of Phoenix, achieved PMP certification in 1998, is President of the PMI Central Florida Chapter, and is a past president of the Maitland (Fla.) Toastmasters Club. He has worked in AT&T management since 1988, and in past years has successfully managed a variety of projects involving AT&T's internal network. While for ten years working 20 to 30 hours per week running a mail-order business in addition to full-time work obligations, he found life much better when he learned and developed a variety of effective time and work management techniques.

Topic:

Gain Ten Free Hours a Week

Abstract:

Like California real estate prices in the 1980's, the trend of project managers' workloads is going only one way - up and up. Project managers have never had so many choices in what to do, what to learn, what to improve. How can we keep up? By managing our time and work better, we can get ten free hours a week.

PMINJ
              Symposium  speaker

Jerry Hill for Larry Lambertsen

Bio:
Mr. Lambertsen is a Manager, Technical Solutions with ESI International, Inc. He is responsible for developing and implementing ESI consulting products and services. He has developed project and process methodologies, including ProjectFOCUS™ a PM knowledge management system. He is also the product manager for ProjectOFFICE™, a project management office model. Mr. Lambertsen has almost 20 years of project management, consulting and strategic planning experience.

Topic:

Developing a Project Office

Abstract:

Organizations, in response to rapidly changing markets and with greater pressures on limited resources, are developing new products and improving services with cross-functional teams in a matrix organizational environment. These organizations recognize the importance of nurturing and developing project management skills, knowledge and competency for individual project team members. As individual project management competency matures, organizations are now evaluating organizational infrastructure that supports the project teams.

One support mechanism that organizations are embracing is the concept of a project management office (PMO), a centralized, consolidated bank of knowledge. The PMO creates an organizational oversight capability to ensure project management is consistently used and continuously improved throughout the organization.

ESI's ProjectOFFICE™ model recognizes that different organizations need different levels of PMO oversight and support - due either to the extent and nature of project work or to the familiarity with project management practices in the organization. This model allows an organization to select an appropriate approach to create a PMO that satisfies its needs for project management oversight, control, and project support.

The presentation will provide background and guidance on establishing a PMO capability tailored to an organization's needs. The discussion will be presented in three sections:
  • Underlying Concepts will introduce the competency continuum, describe the PMO's purpose, identify key factors for success, summarize the primary administration and functional support activities a PMO performs, for both the projects and the organization it represents.
  • Three Stages of the PMO presents a model for how to establish a PMO in progressively comprehensive stages.
  • Guidelines for Establishing a PMO provide general guidance for establishing the PMO structure and environment.

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Ginger Levin
Consultant

Bio:
Ginger Levin, D.P.A., is a senior consultant in project management with more than 25 years of experience. Her specialty areas include project management maturity assessments, development of training programs in project management, program evaluation and auditing, and organization development.  Dr. Levin received her doctorate in public administration and information systems technology from The George Washington University, where she received the outstanding dissertation award for her research on large organizations.

Topic:

Metrics for PM Improvement

Abstract:

Organizations are under pressure to improve performance in order to continue to be successful in the global marketplace. Effectively chosen and delivered projects mean competitive advantage and sustained growth. In project management, metrics can help provide better control of schedule and costs, reduce risks, improve quality, and ensure that business objectives are met. What gets measured, gets done, has long been the "battle cry" of project management professionals.

Although measurement continues to demand increasing attention, metrics initiatives in many organizations continue to exhibit a high failure rate. Metrics are collected, in many cases, because they are available rather than determining why the information is needed. Additionally, often, the value to organizations of a metrics program is not recognized. Some organizations further use metrics incorrectly. For many measurement initiatives, the needs or concerns of the project management professionals who must do the measurement are not considered. The benefits of participating in a measurement program often are not communicated. But, without the right information, you're just another person with an opinion. How many times have you been asked, how do you know you are right? What is the basis for your statement?

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Michael Mah
Managing Partner, QSM Associates, Inc.

Bio:
Michael is a senior consultant with the Cutter Consortium in Arlington Massachusetts, and an owner/partner at QSM Associates Inc., a consulting firm based in Pittsfield Massachusetts.

He is a featured industry conference speaker on process management, organizational dynamics, and productivity benchmarking, and has written numerous articles for technology publications in the last 10 years. Michael is also the editor of a respected industry periodical, Cutter IT Metrics Strategies. His clients have included companies such as Salomon Inc., JP Morgan, Chase, Merrill Lynch, Intel, Rockwell Avionics, Digital Equipment Japan, Sprint, BellSouth, and others.

Michael's particular interest is in people dynamics, whether in family life on topics such as family systems theory and chemical dependency, or in organizational life and the complex interactions between groups, departments, and divisions working on the technology revolution at "Internet Speed". He is also focused on practical applications of the theory and practice of negotiation, dispute resolution and mediation in these settings, including the use of role playing, gestalt techniques, and simulation adapted from couple/family therapies and interventions to increase corporate and personal effectiveness.

Michael's degree is in electrical engineering from Tufts University, Medford, MA, with his training on dispute resolution, mediation, and participatory processes through the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

Michael can be reached at QSM Associates, Inc., ClockTower Business Park, 75 So. Church St., Pittsfield MA 01201. Web Site: www.qsma.com. Or via Cutter Information, 37 Broadway, Arlington MA 01201: www.cutter.com/consortium.

Email: . Tel (413) 499-0988

Topic:

Managing the Three-headed Dragon: Risk, Defects & Deadlines

Abstract:

Commercial pressures of today's economy result in imposed deadlines being the norm for technology projects. Yet, the nature of software projects demand that teams deal with the constant dynamics of change.

This creates extreme degrees of project risk, and perpetuates the so called "software crisis", whereby a large percentage of projects are canceled, delivered late, or with cost overruns and poor quality. However, knowing the nature of these dynamics empowers managers to make decisions on promised functionality, thereby controlling the very factors that degrade software quality and reliability.

This presentation will address why software projects are different than other classes of work. We will discuss benchmarking against "the competition" to fully understand how an organization stacks up, in multiple dimensions of speed, cost, staffing, and reliability. We will address laws of "cause and effect", so that managers can control their own destiny, using proven and reliable techniques for a software project office.

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Paula Martin
CEO of MartinTate

Bio:
Paula Martin is the CEO of MartinTate, a management training and consulting company. Paula is the author of several books: Project Management Memory Jogger™. , Leading Project Management into the 21st Century, Project Sabotage, and The Buck Stops Here: Accountability and the Empowered Manager. Paula is a columnist for PM Network and is a frequent presenter at project management conferences around the world.

Paula Martin consults with senior and middle level management on organizational structure, matrix management, project steering, management accountability and other key leadership issues. Prior to becoming a consultant she was the director of American Cyanamid's new product development efforts in the U.S., steering hundreds of projects and project teams.

Topic:

Be a Sadistic Facilitator

Abstract:

A lot has been written about how moving from a directive style of managing projects to a participative one will produce greater team ownership and accountability in projects and that this ownership will result in projects that are completed faster, with less rework and with more fun. Obviously we don't want any part of this new approach. It's much better to keep team members in the dark, passing on bits and pieces of information as they are absolutely required in order to produce the minimum results required.

If you're interested in continuing to manage projects that are filled with chaos, unmotivated team members, and lengthy timelines, then you must learn the art of sadistic facilitation. This will guarantee minimal participation from team members and maximum control by the project manager.

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Rita Mulcahy PMP
Consultant RMC-PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Bio:
Rita Mulcahy, PMP is an internationally recognized expert in project management, risk management and the PMP exam. She is the author of the books PMP Exam Prep, Hot Topics, and Project Management for the Business Professional (co-author) and the CD-ROM PM FASTrack for helping people get ready for the PMP Exam. Rita has been a monthly contributor to PMI's PM Network and has spoken to standing room only crowds and presented encore presentations at PMI's annual conference for an unheard of 3 years in a row. Rita is the president of RMC Project Management and has over $2.5 billion of hands-on project experience. Come hear a presentation that has drawn record attendance across the country!

Topic:

Successful PMs

Abstract:

Every project manager wants to be successful, yet the definition of "successful" has may answers. Based on my 15 years and $2.5 billion US of hands-on project experience, research, and years spent training and mentoring over 4,000 project managers, this is my answer. Presented to standing room only crowds and a coveted Encore Presentation at PMI's annual conference, this presentation is guaranteed to make you think. Come join this humorous look at the reality of what it takes to be successful!

PMINJ
              Symposium

Paul Royer

Bio:
Paul Royer is a Senior Project Manager in the Strategy & Enterprise Integration and Business Intelligence/Data Warehouse practices of Ciber, Inc in Seattle, Washington. His industry background includes state and county governments and extensive experience in a large health maintenance organization. For the past five years, he has concentrated on the risk aspects of project management; Management Concepts, Inc. in the third quarter of 2001 will publish his book, Proactive Risk Management. He has a BA in Computer Science from UC Berkeley where he has also taught data modeling, relational database design, and structured analysis.

Topic:

How Healthy is your Program?

Abstract:

As enterprises become project oriented, programs of inter-related projects are becoming more common. Just as with projects, programs can get into trouble. This presentation offers a fast, non-quantitative yet objective technique for examining program health and potential risks in the areas of organization, planning, financial resources, direction, coordination, communication, staffing resources, control, risk assessment, and seeking remedies.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Lou Russell

Bio:
Lou Russell has been the president of Russell Martin & Associates, Indianapolis, a consulting and training company focusing on improving planning, process and performance since 1987. She has served as a consultant to companies, schools, churches and colleges helping each grow their organization's ability to learn. Lou is the author of two books, The Accelerated Learning Fieldbook: Making the Instructional Process Fast, Flexible and Fun, 1999; Project Management for Trainers, 2000, and numerous publications including Computerworld, Cutter Executive Reports, Auerbach, Training and Software Development. Her national conference speaking experience includes: Training, Training Directors Forum, International Society for Performance Instruction, International Alliance for Learning, Support Services, Systems Development, Project Management Institute, Project World, National Association of Simulation and Gaming, GIGA World and American Society for Training and Development.

Lou's diverse career has been as a programmer, database administrator, Help Desk implementer / manager and manager of technical training. She also taught database and programming classes at Purdue University. She is past-president of the Indianapolis SIM organization, was elected to "Who's Who in Indiana Technology," 1995, and serves on the Indiana High Tech Task Force. She is also a senior consultant with the Cutter Consortium. She is the proud mom of three girls.

Topic:

Treat the Whole Patient - Systemic Project Management Improvement

Abstract:

To meet the challenges clients and customers bring today, companies must achieve an optimal contribution from each staff member. The turbulence of both the technologies and the marketplace results in the continual appearance of new challenges and opportunities. Companies need work groups that embrace learning, adaptation and collaboration as a normal mode of operation. The solution to improving project management capacity must be systemic and holistic. A sample solution set is presented.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Aita Salasoo
Senior Director Telcordia Tecnologies

Bio:
Dr. Salasoo is currently Executive Director in the Rapid System Integration Business Unit at Telcordia Technologies. In this capacity, she has business development and project delivery responsibility for a number of major IT systems integration and custom software development projects for customers in the convergent communications marketplace. These include OSS/BSS solutions, EAI-based solutions, and IT solutions for Integrated Communications Providers. Since joining Telcordia (then Bellcore) in 1986, Dr. Salasoo has held a variety of technical and management positions in the company. As a systems engineer, she developed Telcordia's early graphical user interface engineering tools. She led the integration of usability methods into the Telcordia Software Development Life Cycle quality processes, and more recently has championed Telcordia's systems integration methodology. She established both the usability consulting practice, and has grown and managed the Rapid Applications Deployment and Telcordia's Australian Regional Delivery organizations. Since the early 1990's, Dr. Salasoo has served as product manager for several Telcordia research-based applications, and managed a number of different businesses that have spanned the business lifecycle from new start ups in leading-edge technologies, to mature, stable businesses.

Dr. Salasoo received B.A. (Hons) degrees in Psychology and Italian from Sydney University in Australia, and she holds the Ph.D. degree in Cognitive Psychology from Indiana University. Dr. Salasoo earned her PMP in 1998. Prior to joining Telcordia, Dr. Salasoo was on the faculty of Binghamton University.

Topic:

How to Manage Projects "In the Boonies”


Abstract:

Most project managers have a comfort zone based on their experience, specifically associated with the economic, geographic and cultural contexts, industries, and companies in which they have worked. When projects introduce new contextual elements, using the project management core knowledge and your experience (with an intentional focus on flexibility and awareness of the unknown) can help a project manager succeed. Communication and planning for change are the key success factors.

This presentation addresses the experiences of U.S.-trained project managers who were asked to manage IT and telecommunications projects in Australia, Latin America, and South Africa. The lessons learned relate to local project management standards, appreciation for project management, use of language, and appreciation of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Understanding customers' and partners' basic needs comes first, and to truly understand, the contextual and language issues need to be addressed in earnest.

Examples and tips will be shared that will help managers of international and global projects specifically, but will heighten the sensitivities of all project managers to seeking, recognizing, and managing through the unexpected settings and customer attributes of your projects.

* Boonies are an Australian abbreviation for Boondocks, a remote and uninhabited area.

speaker

Kelly Slone PMP

Bio:
Kelly Slone has over ten years of professional experience within the technical education and telecommunications industries where she has been involved in leading software development projects as well as Y2K initiatives.

Kelly is a Program Manager for the Project Management Leadership Group where she is responsible for implementing project management methodology and project office programs.

She obtained her Bachelor of Business Administration from Kennesaw State University and her Master of Project Management degree from Keller Graduate School. Aside from her consulting activities, she is also a lead instructor of PMLG's Certified Project Manager certification.

Topic:

Staying Afloat - Noah's Top Ten PM Strategies

Abstract:

Today's modern business world is a complex one; it's a fluid, ever-changing environment where technology changes can be dated within a calendar year and where clients are becoming savvier across all industries. Driven by time to market and the "better, faster, cheaper" syndrome, modern project management warriors arm themselves with slick software scheduling tools and mobile phones in attempt to bring some sense of order and control to otherwise chaotic projects. They fight the good fight in a virtual battlefield of teleconferences and e-mails striving to see their crusade through to success.

In many ways, the advancement of technology has allowed each of us as project managers to become more knowledgeable about our project's status as well as become more responsive to issues and changes that naturally show during a project's execution. The benefits are undeniable.

But, has it made us more successful project managers? Too often, project managers plant themselves in front of computer monitors building project schedules, tracking actuals, and wading through piles of e-mail when time could be better spent elsewhere. It has become easy to forget that the time we spend away from our computer may serve us better in the end.

Why is this the case? Because through projects themselves are unique they each depend on one common element - the involvement of people. The most successful project managers understand that a balance must be found between the technical tasks that they must be responsible for and the leadership they must provide for the project stakeholders. Much of a project manager's achievements are dictated by how well he is able to integrate and inspire his team, maintain communication, and build relationships.

Noah, who might even be coined as the world's first project manager, was effective at delivering this critical leadership, and he exhibited what could be termed "lifeboat strategies", or commitments, to stay afloat instead of sinking. These strategies still hold true today and can provide great value for present day project managers.


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