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PMINJ 2002 Symposium Speakers

16th Annual Symposium

06 May 2002

Edison - Pines Manor

Introduction
Agenda
Speakers
Posters
Sponsors
Photos


Speakers


Speaker Topic
Keynote Speakers
Howland Blackiston and Jennifer Herman PM Mania
Daniel E. Kline Can You Get Everything Done and Still Have a Life?
Rania Kort Evolving the Next Generation Project Manager
Track Speakers
James M. Barnard
Developing “Master” Project Managers
Alex S. Brown, PMP
Project Management Personality & Skill Types
Robert P. Eagan, PMP, MBA
The Demise of Long-Term Large-Scale Projects: What Should a Project Manager Do?
Deborah Elms, PMP
Making More Effective Project and Portfolio Decisions
Ava Heuer, PMP
Transitioning Project Management Skills from Large Corporations to Small Companies
Jonathan R. Japka, PMP
Scheduling Made Easy Getting the Basics Right
Judith Mills
Effective Performance Reporting of Projects
Bharat A. Parikh, PMP, PE
Technology Startups: A Roller Coaster Ride
Frank Patrick
Project Management is Really Risk Management
Frank P. Saladis, PMP
CPR for IT Projects
James J. Schneidmuller, PMP
From Project Management Council to Center of Excellence
Marina Spence, PMP
How Project Managers Sabotage Their Message
J. LeRoy Ward, PMP
Role of the Executive Sponsor in Creating a Project Management Culture
Henry C. Will IV, PMP
Project Management in the Midst of Chaos
William H Willson FRICS MAPM MIVM
Commercial Risk Management

PMINJ
              Symposium

James M. Barnard

Bio:
Mr. Barnard is the Vice President of Client Solutions for ESI International. His responsibilities include assisting ESI clients with the development and execution of project management performance improvement initiatives & strategies. Mr. Barnard has held several executive positions at ESI including Deputy Director, IBM Programs and Motorola Program Director

He has more than 26 years of experience in senior project and program management in the government and commercial arenas. He has provided successful and effective leadership on projects involving product development & implementation, system integration & information technology. Mr. Barnard is a proven leader in the development of cost/benefit and requirements analyses, risk analysis and mitigation, strategic planning, and source selection.

As the Deputy Program Manager for IBM, he was responsible for the management of curriculum development of several core courses including Advanced Scheduling and Project Management Applications. Additionally, he provided on-site project management coaching and mentoring support to product development teams at IBM facilities nationwide including Raleigh/Durham, NC, Rochester, MN, and Austin, TX.

As the ESI Motorola Program Director, Mr. Barnard managed and directed the implementation of Motorola University’s global project management performance improvement initiative.

Prior to ESI, Mr. Barnard was the Director of Programs for MCI where he successfully directed the development and implementation of MCI’s Operator Services and Payphone project including the management of a team of more than 300 engineering, operational, and vendor personnel.

Additionally, Mr. Barnard has extensive government project & contract management experience. He has managed $450 million dollars in government contracts for the Departments of State, Treasury and Agriculture.

Mr. Barnard received his degree in Accounting/Finance from the University of Cincinnati. He is a member of the Project Management Institute.

Topic:

Developing “Master” Project Managers

Abstract:

The business landscape changes on a daily basis. Consequently, organizations are looking for project managers who take a holistic approach to their jobs, focusing not just on tactical details, but on the implications for the enterprise as a whole.

This holistic approach requires project managers to have unique set of competencies to successfully perform at the highest levels within organization and help companies achieve their business objectives.

The presentation will provide background and guidance on developing a master project management capability.

PMINJ
              Symposium

G. Howland Blackiston

Bio:
 
G. Howland Blackiston is Executive Vice President, International Institute for Learning, Inc. (IIL). The company is a leading provider of training and consulting in “project management”. Prior to joining IIL Mr. Blackiston was co-founder and President (for 20 years) of Juran Institute, Inc. (a world leader in “continuous improvement” and how companies manage the quality of products and services.

Mr. Blackiston has published numerous papers and has been the featured speaker or keynote at hundreds of events and broadcasts all around the world. He is the creator and executive producer of more than 150 multimedia-training programs that have been translated into 16 languages and utilized by thousands of organizations in over 40 countries.

Mr. Blackiston is a member of ASQ, The Presidents Association, PMI, and is a National Judge for the Blue Chip Enterprise Award. He is a director of the Westport School of Music and sits on the Board of Advisors for the Bridgeport School of Engineering.

 
speaker


Jennifer M. Herman

Bio:
 
Jennifer Herman is the Vice President and Director of New Business Development at Interational Institute for Learning, Inc. (IIL) New York, New York. She is solely responsible for the New York Metropolitan sales region and also manages IIL, Inc.’s New York learning center. Jennifer promotes New York based courses focused on Product Management, Theory of Constraints and computer software training. She acts as a consultant to help her clients determine which classes and delivery methods best meet their business objectives. Jennifer also works with companies to bring IIL’s programs and consultants onsite to deliver comprehensive customized training curriculums that meet specific client requirements.

Prior to joining IIL, Inc., Jennifer was an executive with a leading Sportswear manufacturer where she managed the merchandising and sales in over 190 stores. Jennifer has also been an art consultant at a leading Massachusetts gallery and was a television anchor and reporter for NNN Television, Newton, MA. In addition to Jennifer’s professional background, she has attended acting school and has starred in regional plays such as Mary Poppins and Grease.

Jennifer holds a B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Boston University, Boston, MA. While attending Boston University, she played a lead role in generating funds for the Travis Roy Rehabilitation Campaign.

Along with playing soccer, rollerbladding, working out and free style dancing. Jennifer enjoys having fun with her little Boston terrier “Bubba”.

Topic:

PM Mania


Abstract:

What usually happens to conference attendees after lunch? Eyelids get heavy? Heads begin to nod? Well, get ready for something out of the ordinary! We'll have you on the edge of your seat with PM MANIA! it's what some instructional design circles call "entertRainment," an interactive learning experience, laced with fun in a game format. You could think of it as Alex Trebek meets the project management discipline. You'll learn valuable lessons in project management while having a blast! You'll even have a chance to compete and win thousands of dollars in valuable prizes. So don't miss PM MANIA. After lunch, fasten your seatbelts and be sure to join Howland Blackiston and Jennifer Herman from the International Institute of Learning for a rousing and interactive learning adventure!

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Alex S. Brown, PMP

Bio:
Alex S. Brown has been a software project manager since 1993, working in the brokerage and insurance industries. He is a Project Management Professional (PMP) and member of PMI. He is also a member of IEEE, IEEE Computer Society, and ACM. He has worked on large-scale computing projects, including the launch of the Merrill Lynch Direct web-based service. He is currently a Project Manager for Chubb & Son, implementing an intranet-based rewrite of the 20-year-old claims financial system.

Topic:

Project Management Personality & Skill Types

Abstract:

Project Managers often have to serve as the career consultant to people interested in Project Management. It is also natural to wonder now and again if we are well-suited to our Project Management jobs. PMI has provided us with wonderful tools to guide the growth of Project Managers in their careers, but little to evaluate the basic skills and personality traits that Project Managers need. Many career-guidance web sites offer skill and personality assessments. Project Management appears as a career option only indirectly, as a management job in project-oriented industries like software or construction. For now, Project Managers need to create their own career-guidance tools, until PMI or career-guidance firms begin to meet our needs.

This presentation will describe how to adapt standard, career-guidance tools to Project Management. It is never easy making a career recommendation, but these tools can help make a better-informed, more objective recommendation. Experienced Project Managers can use these tools to better understand their management style, and help predict what assignments and situations may be particularly easy or difficult for them. Core skills like negotiation and mentoring, and personality traits like introvert/extrovert are critical to job. Learn how to adapt some time-tested tools to Project Management, to understand yourself better and to guide others more objectively.

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Robert P. Eagan, PMP, MBA

Bio:
Bob has over 20 years of Project Management experience, and is currently a Senior Technology Consultant for Automatic Data Processing. Bob has the Project Management Certification (PMP) from the Project Management Institute (PMI), has been a Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Lead Assessor, and he has a Masters Certificate in Project Management from the George Washington University and an MBA from Fairleigh Dickenson University.

The Software Engineering Institute (SEI) recently recognized Bob’s contributions as an author and editor of a draft version of the Capability Maturity Model Integrated (CMMI) that will replace an industry standard for software development i.e., CMM. Bob presented a paper at the annual SEI SEPG Conference in 1999 on Process Action Teams.

Bob has held Management positions up to Vice-President within organizations that range from less than 200 employees to multi-national Fortune 200 organizations.

Topic:

The Demise of Long-Term Large-Scale Projects: What Should a Project Manager Do?

Abstract:

Companies increasingly believe that improving time to market for new products is an absolute necessity to remain competitive; especially for E-Business applications that need to be developed in “Internet Time”. Right or wrong this perception has energized research on the topic. The often-cited McKinsey and Co. report states that it is better to be on time and over budget than to be late but on budget. Although this report warns of the dangers of overemphasis on speed, senior business management has become extremely sensitive to the relationship of speed to market and market competitiveness.

Today’s development applications must be characterized by small teams using iterative development to release products in intervals of one to six months. Gone are the days of 18-24 month projects delivering their products at the very end of the cycle.

The challenge for Project Managers is to design a process that will deliver on the promises. Software Methodologies such as eXtreme Programming and tools such as the Rational Suite can help. However, there are certain processes in the PMBOK that require more emphasis than others. The objective of this presentation is to emphasize the primary Project Management processes that a Project Manager must consider when adopting an iterative development approach.

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Deborah Elms, PMP

Bio:
Deborah Elms, PMP, is a Senior Consultant in Project Management at Business Plus Software, Inc. She is a member of PMI, the NYC and Long Island chapters and several SIGs. After many years in technical roles in systems development, Deborah moved into project management. She has a broad background in the definition, deployment and promotion of structured project management, process improvement, and software development methodologies. Deborah currently focuses on assisting organizations implement project services and skills, including better ways of selecting and managing projects and vendors.

Topic:

Making More Effective Project and Portfolio Decisions

Abstract:

Billions of dollars and millions of hours of effort are wasted every year, on failed and inappropriate projects. Often this can be traced back to the wrong decisions being made, at the wrong time, by the wrong people, using the wrong inputs, without benefit of structured decision-making methods.

This presentation will introduce you to the tools, techniques and best practices of effective decision-making. Use these skills immediately to assist your teams in making better decisions. Leverage your expertise in decision-making to suggest or support improvements to your organization’s project selection and portfolio management process.

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Ava Heuer, PMP

Bio:
Ava Heuer is a Project Manager with experience in both the defense industry and telecommunications arena. She began her career at Bell Laboratories, designing underwater sonar systems built to detect and track enemy submarines. After transitioning to Project Management in 1990, she managed various defense projects within Bell Laboratories, and later managed software development programs within the Mobile Communications Division at Lucent Technologies. She is now the Senior Manager responsible for OEM programs at WatchMark Corporation, headquartered in Bellevue, Washington. Throughout her career, Ava has been instrumental in providing project management training, consulting, mentoring and coaching, especially in the areas of team development, project organization, risk management, team leadership, negotiations, conflict management, and business decision-making. For the past 3 years, Ava has been the Vice President of Professional Development for PMI NJ Chapter, and is dedicated to promoting project management best practices throughout the industry. She is also affiliated with Boston University and teaches in their Project Management Certificate program. Ava holds a BS and MS in Electrical Engineering from New Jersey Institute of Technology, a Masters Certificate in Project Management from George Washington University, and is a certified PMP.

Topic:

Transitioning Project Management Skills from Large Corporations to Small Companies

Abstract:

While understanding and applying the tenets of the Project Management Body of Knowledge will always be the best foundation for project success, in today’s increasingly volatile markets it is simply not enough. The key driver enabling project managers to be effective in today’s rapidly changing markets, downsized companies, and culturally diverse environments is flexibility. By recognizing in advance the differences in the way project management is practiced and perceived in large mega-corporations and smaller independent companies, and similarly between large organizations and down-sized ones, the project manager will be better equipped to plan effective strategies to be successful in any type of environment. This presentation explores the most important differences encountered in these diverse situations and offers some ideas for how project managers can tailor their activities to suit the situation. It also goes a step further and introduces the pitfalls that may result when large and small companies must work together as business partners.

The most important differences in the way project management is perceived and implemented in large versus small companies fall into a few categories: value placed on project management, roles of project managers, organizational structure, process development, and overhead. And while not all of these will be encountered in every situation, by being aware that they might exist, the project manager will be prepared and can tailor their approach to the situation such that they add immediate value to the company. And as companies downsize to focus on core businesses, more strategic alliances are being formed to complement the product line. And when these alliances are between companies that differ in size, market share, or corporate “culture,” the relationship can be disastrous. There are some key lessons-learned that will be presented here, to help ensure a successful business partnership despite the differences between the companies.

By understanding how project management “works” in different sized companies, the project manager will be better able to operate efficiently and effectively in any situation in today’s volatile marketplace

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Jonathan R. Japka, PMP

Bio:
Mr. Japka has been involved with Project Management for more than 21 years earning his PMP in 1996. For the last 11 years Mr. Japka has been with ETRAC Solutions (formerly Robert-andrew Associates). During that time he has assisted many Fortune 500 clients implementing enterprise level project management solutions including process and software support. Clients include Lucent Technologies, Dupont R&D, Lookheed-Martin, Wyeth-Ayerst, Merck, Novartis Consumer Health, Merrill-Lynch, Foster-Wheeler, PSE&G, Exelon, NJ DOT, and the NYC School Construction Authority.

Mr. Japka is a leading expert with Primavera Systems project management software. As an Authorized Primavera Instructor he has taught over 3600 students. Mr. Japka also teaches Project Management Foundations classes for Villanova and Rowan Universities. Mr. Japka is a graduate of Rutgers College of Engineering and specialized in Construction Management.

Topic:

Scheduling Made Easy Getting the Basics Right

Abstract:

In a project management world where everyone talks of PMO’s and other lofty ideas the art of basic project scheduling has been lost. You know a bad schedule when you see it, but what makes up a good schedule? We all know Time Management is at the core of project success.

Improve your scheduling skills by joining Mr. Japka in exploring: What make a good WBS? What is an appropriate level of detail? How often should I update? Simplifying activity progress collection. Getting the logic right! These and other important scheduling topics will be covered. Extra time will be given for audience discussion. Come and share your ideas. This session is applicable to all industries and all software packages.
 

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Daniel E. Kline

Bio:
Daniel E. Kline is an internationally recognized speaking professional who, since 1990, has been inspiring, motivating, entertaining, and informing audiences around the world. He has addressed over 100,000 people in the United States, Canada, Colombia, Brazil, Great Britain, Spain, the Netherlands, Russia, Poland, Australia, Malaysia, China, and Japan. He draws his popular presentations from over 30 years of combined and varied experience as a speaker, writer, retailer, and federal government manager. Since 1981, when he first became fully self-employed, Dan created two unique gift stores, co-founded and operates a nationwide consulting service for writers, and formed and presides over a national speaking and training firm specializing in workplace communication issues, from leadership, team building, and time management to crafting an excellent speech, letter or memo—and more, and, most recently, consults as a freelancer for the American Management Association.

Dan’s relaxed, easy style and sense of humor win audiences over to both difficult and lighter subjects alike. He has received overwhelmingly outstanding evaluations from his listeners, who frequently comment afterward on his powerful stage presence, commitment to values and principles, and their surprise at how his topics can be informative, educational and entertaining, all at the same time!

Topic:

Can You Get Everything Done and Still Have a Life?

Abstract:

Do you ever feel “There’s just too much to do and not enough time to do it”? If so, you need help. Start by investing an hour or so in the seminar titled Can You Really Get Everything Done—and Still Have a Life?

The trick is to learn how to minimize de-motivators and to maximize motivators. De-motivators tend to contribute less, relative to the effort expended, plus they often have a harsh, demanding, have-to or “got-to” value attached to them. Motivators are just the opposite: they contribute greatly despite a lesser effort, and they often have a positive get-to or “want-to” value. Thus, what’s stressed is not efficiency but effectiveness—“doing the right thing,” rather than “doing things right.”

The point is to help attendees see and understand why they behave as they do, so that real, positive, permanent change becomes possible. The goal is to help all to enjoy more productive, balanced, and satisfying lives—as quickly as possible.

PMINJ
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Rania Kort

Bio:
Rania Kort currently leads a practice for PricewaterhouseCoopers Consulting that focuses on Information Systems Development, Program and Project Management and Process Improvement Programs. In her existing partner role as the Client IT account Leader, her primary responsibilities are to ensure that her consulting staff working on various client projects are delivering high quality work that is yielding project success and the necessary customer satisfaction. She has worked with many large corporations in setting up management processes, driving organizational change, implementing performance improvement programs and managing large-scale releases and projects at an enterprise level. She has led large business process re-engineering efforts, managed the operations of both small and large businesses and owned her own entrepreneurial firm prior to joining PwC, where she also helped start-up companies set up their management infrastructure and designed their overall organization framework.

Rania has spoken at local and international conferences, has published articles on improving IT effectiveness and efficiency and is currently in the process of writing her first book on Managing Perception - A critical role for Project Managers and Management Professionals. She has developed and conducted extensive number of training sessions and seminars in process and project management and holds a Masters of Arts and a Masters of Science from Syracuse University.

Topic:

Evolving the Next Generation Project Manager

Abstract:

Project Managers today have a lot more to contend with, above and beyond managing their project scope, schedule, cost, quality, and risks. In reality, they could be excellent in managing these overall project management knowledge areas and have solid control of the project management lifecycle and processes, yet find they are increasingly being challenged with having to repeatedly sell and justify the benefits of their project. This unveils the fact that Project Managers have to now understand the overall goal of their organization, ensure their project goals and objectives are aligned with the management supporting it and be politically astute to the agendas of the stakeholders. As a matter of fact, too many times, we see that it is not only about how well the project is going, but more about how the project is perceived it is going, regardless of what is being reported. It is very much about how communication is conveyed and moreover, how behavior is guided through the corporate network which could have significant impact on a project.

So how do we better manage this invisible but inherent problem and protect against any negative misperceptions? Actually, there is a process that all Project Managers need to be aware of in dealing with this issue - It is the art and skill of "Managing Perception" as part of understanding stakeholder influence and strategically managing behavior to preserve the "reputation" of their projects. It is the campaign that Project Managers need to launch starting from the initiation phase all the way through the Closing Phase of a project.

The Key Note speech will go into what Project Managers of the Next Generation should be aware of in managing their projects which are beyond the Project Management Processes. It will describe how Perception Management can be used in raising the bar by integrating a distinct and separate entity of the project management process that deals with areas such as politics, sales, human behavior and organization culture. It will focus on the important soft skills that are needed in managing projects and the effective communication tools that can be utilized to make projects run smoother. Moreover, it will provide ideas on how to prepare Project Managers to deal with the hidden challenges that play such an active and critical role in the personal success of the Project Manager running it, as well as, the success of the project itself.

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Judith Mills

Bio:
Before founding JEMWORX, Ms. Mills was Director of Quality at LoBue Holdings, L.L.C. Her responsibilities included the development and deployment of curricula for both clients and internal training purposes, the implementation of enhanced Management Processes, the creation of Project Metrics to monitor engagement quality, and the management of the firm’s knowledge base intranet site.

Prior to assuming the responsibilities of Director of Quality, Ms. Mills was a product development and management specialist at both Allison~LoBue Group, L.L.C., a provider of complexity science management consulting services and at LoBue Associates, an international management-consulting firm, both subsidiaries of LoBue Holdings, L.L.C.

Ms. Mills is experienced in core methodology design. She specializes in tactical applications of strategic business concepts enabling organizations to implement major business design changes, which enhance productivity, profitability and competitive advantage.

In a career spanning over 20 years, Ms. Mills has worked with large domestic and international financial institutions in areas such as operations, retail banking, financial and strategic planning, systems design and implementation.

In addition to her work at JEMWORX, Ms. Mills is on the board of trustees of her local congregation. She is a graduate of Bucknell University, with degrees in Economics and French. She holds a master of business administration in bank management from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Topic:

Effective Performance Reporting of Projects

Abstract:

All businesses have a management process for performance reporting whether it is codified (formal) or not. If the process is formal, it is most likely documented in some media (hard copy, intra-net, etc.). An informal process can be summed up in a statement of “This is the way we do things here”.

The management of individual projects is not unlike the management process involved in the ongoing management of a business unit itself. End products (goals) are to be delivered, there are processes by which these end products are created/achieved, resources are used (people, systems, financials) and performance reporting of some type is required. The Project Management Body of Knowledge speaks to the first three elements with great detail. However, the last matter, Performance Reporting, is often relegated to an ad hoc reactive effort: Though often overlooked, the benefits of effective performance reporting accrue to all “stakeholders” in an initiative.

This presentation will take participants through a phased approach to the development of an effective Performance Reporting process for projects.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Bharat A. Parikh, PMP, PE

Bio:
Mr. Bharat Parikh is currently the President and CEO of Zenfinity, Incorporated, a company he co-founded. Zenfinity provides design, deployment, and operations services to service provider and enterprise customers, leveraging new technology products to create a converged infrastructure, offering a multitude of services. Mr. Parikh has over 16 years of professional experience in the telecommunications industry. He spent 12 years with the US Army’s Communications Electronics Command; where he engineered and subsequently managed a frequency hopping secure satellite communications modem and control system. While with the US Army, Mr. Parikh was the US representative for a NATO waveform standards committee for satellite communications. Mr. Parikh has spent the last 4 years working in technology professional services at International Network Services, which was purchased by Lucent Technologies, and Zenfinity. Mr. Parikh has a B. S. in Electrical Engineering from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ and a M. S. in Electrical Engineering with a specialization in Communications from Fairleigh Dickinson University, Teaneck, NJ. Mr. Parikh also possesses a Professional Engineering (PE) license from the state of New Jersey and holds a Project Management Professional certification from the Project Management Institute.

Topic:

Technology Startups: A Roller Coaster Ride

Abstract:

For entrepreneurs, starting your own company is always on their minds. In the technology space, there have been numerous opportunities to start a company in the past 10 years. But starting a company in this high technology, high-performance environment isn’t the same as it used to be. Leveraging the standards placed on Project Management by the PMI, and raising the bar associated with executing on the principles of project management, this paper talks about one experience of how a technology startup company can be created. The highs and lows of creating a startup are truly rewarding and frustrating, but, at the end, given good strategic support and structured execution, forming a new company can be a satisfying venture.

But through it all, it is important to look at the lessons learned from previous entrepreneurs on how to successfully ride this roller coaster, so you don’t quite get to the point where you want to jump off. The issues surrounding investors, founders, employees, customers, vendors, and everyone and everything else that goes in to creating a successful startup venture can be overwhelming. Employing key project management principles will ensure that you tackle the most difficult problems in a systematic fashion, and that is crucial when everyone is looking to you as the founder to maintain your composure and cool in troubled times. This paper helps link the principles of project management with starting your own technology startup.

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Frank Patrick

Bio:
Francis S. “Frank” Patrick is founder and principal consultant of Focused Performance, providing education, consultation, and facilitation in the realm of the organizational effectiveness. As such, he has been involved in assisting a wide range of organizations to achieve breakthrough solutions for significant results through the application of the Theory of Constraints and its associated applications. A New Jersey native, and a graduate of Rutgers University’s school of engineering, Frank’s 25-year corporate career included responsibilities in industrial engineering, production planning, new product development, and process management consultation at Revlon, Johnson & Johnson, Nabisco, and AT&T/Bell Labs, where he was first exposed to TOC. Subsequently, since launching Focused Performance in 1996, Frank has added organizations involved in developing sophisticated hardware/software systems, financial services, precision machining, IT support, and defense systems to his experience. With most of his recent efforts associated with strategic planning, operational problem solving, and Critical Chain-based project management, Frank has become a recognized advisor, writer, and presenter on these topics, both in the US and abroad.

Topic:

Project Management is Really Risk Management

Abstract:

Assuring the success of a project involves, first and foremost, dealing with the uncertainty that will be associated with its delivery. Project Management is the process of turning uncertain events and efforts into certain promises and outcomes. If this is the case, then the primary process associated with project management should be that of risk management. How other processes, such as scope, schedule, and spending management support the identification, assessment, mitigation, and avoidance of risk is therefore critical for successful project management and for maximizing the value of our project-based efforts.

Critical Chain-based project management has, at the core of its design, recognition of and focus on the management of uncertainty and risk. This presentation will look at the sources of risk that are possible in various aspects of the project management process, discuss how they might be dealt with in general, and how the Critical Chain approach specifically does so.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Frank P. Saladis, PMP

Bio:
Frank P. Saladis, PMP, is Project Management Trainer and Consultant specializing in the development and delivery of programs focused on enhancing the tools and skills of the project management practitioner. As a Project Manager for Cisco Systems Inc. he was responsible for developing project methodologies, processes and training programs for Cisco Professional Services. Mr. Saladis is currently a Senior Consultant and Instructor for the International Institute for Learning Inc. and is a former National Project Manager for AT&T Solutions Information Technology Services. He is a Certified Project Management Professional and has been a featured presenter at the Project Management Institute's Annual Symposiums, Project World Seminars, Frontiers in Project Management, and numerous PMI ® chapters and components. He is the Past President of the New York City Chapter-PMI, Past President of the Assembly of Chapter Presidents, Past Vice President of Education for the Global Communications Technology Specific Interest Group of PMI and current Vice Chair for the PMI ® IT & Telecom Specific Interest Group. He holds a Masters Certificate in Commercial Project management from George Washington University.

Topic:

CPR for IT Projects


Abstract:

Taking the concepts of emergency care and the actions of personnel trained to react to serious injury and trauma, this paper will compare the methods used by medical professionals to assess, treat, and prepare a recovery strategy for patients with the processes and procedures utilized to assist in the treatment and recovery of projects in trouble. CPR in this presentation is defined as Critical Path Resuscitation. The presentation will examine some of the main causes of project failure and what steps can be taken to prevent further damage, return to project to a healthy state, and prepare a plan for prevention from a relapse. This is an interactive session with significant audience participation.

speaker

James J. Schneidmuller, PMP

Bio:
Jim Schneidmuller’s project management accomplishments include:
  • the creation and leadership of a professional project management organization for AT&T’s Information Technology Services group
  • work in AT&T Solutions as a member of the Global Transition Team for the Citicorp engagement, the largest networking outsourcing agreement signed at that time
  • leadership of the AT&T Solutions Project Management Center of Excellence
  • today’s leadership of the corporate AT&T Project Management Center of Excellence focused on the ongoing deployment of best-in-class project management principles, processes, and practices for AT&T
 Jim wrote a chapter for Project Management for Business Professionals: A Comprehensive Guide, a John Wiley & Sons book, which defines the current state of project management in business and details all of the competencies that constitute a superior practice. He is an Affiliate Professor of the Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management, Stevens Institute of Technology Project Management Program.

Topic:

From Project Management Council to Center of Excellence

Abstract:

We have experienced what we believe to be a natural progression from a Project Management Council to the establishment of a Project Management Center of Excellence (PMCOE). We will share with attendees the past, present and anticipated future of our PMCOE.

Within the presentation we will describe the organizational structure and staffing strategies. The areas of focus and the team environment that exist will be included.

Key partnerships with other organizations within the company are vital to the PMCOE’s success. These partnerships will be discussed, as well as important linkages to other areas of the business. A review of our operational model, which defines the relationship among our Project Managers, the Council, and our Executive Council, will also be a part of the presentation.

To sum it all, we will share with symposium attendees the knowledge we have acquired as a result of the development of our Project Management Center of Excellence. We will share what worked well and what did not along with our accomplishments and the roadblocks we encountered along the way. We will share our lessons learned. We will also provide a preview of our thoughts for the future of the PMCOE in 2002 and beyond… how we plan to continue to “raise the PM bar”.

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Marina Spence, PMP

Bio:
Marina Spence, PMP, is a Managing Partner at Omada Management Group, located in New York City. Omada is the Greek word for "team", which reflects Ms. Spence's specialty in project management. For over 12 years, she has managed projects and programs in companies ranging from brash start-ups to Fortune 50, for both business and Information Technology groups, helping them to blend structured project management with team-based approaches.

Ms. Spence has presented papers at the 2000 New York City PMI Symposium, 2001 PMI Europe Conference, and has been a guest speaker at the Long Island PMI Chapter meeting. She is active in the New York City chapter of PMI, where she initiated the successful Breakfast Roundtable Program, and is now the Vice-President and Director of Programs. Her Master's degree is from the University of California, Berkeley, and she holds undergraduate degrees from the University of Minnesota and from California State University, Northridge.

Topic:

How Project Managers Sabotage Their Message


Abstract:

Project Managers spend 90% of our time communicating. If you earn $100,000 per year, your company pays $90,000 for your communication skills. Do your communication skills give your company their ROI? Or do you sabotage the message you deliver to stakeholders in crucial ways? In this session you will learn three principle ways in which Project Managers undercut their message--and how to avoid them.

"How Project Managers Sabotage their Message" will be presented as a series of one-act plays. Each play will present a cast of characters caught in the act of sabotaging their message. The presentation will be interactive, with opportunities for small-group discussion. Participants should gain an increased understanding of their responsibility in the communication process, as well as learn practical techniques for increasing their effectiveness as communicators.

PMINJ
              Symposium

J. LeRoy Ward, PMP

Bio:
J. LeRoy Ward, Executive Vice President, is responsible for ESI’s worldwide training programs, international activities, and curriculum development. Complementing a 17-year career with four U.S. federal agencies, Mr. Ward has delivered project management programs to clients in North and Central America, Europe, Asia, and Australia.

He has authored several publications and articles including Project Management Terms, A Working Glossary, PMP Challenge!, and ProjectFRAMEWORK: A Project Management Maturity Model. He speaks frequently on project management and related topics at professional association meetings and conferences around the world.

Mr. Ward holds BS and MS degrees from Southern Connecticut State University and an MSTM degree, with distinction, from The American University.

Mr. Ward is a member of numerous professional associations including the International Project Management Association and the Project Management Institute where he is certified as a Project Management Professional.

Topic:

Role of the Executive Sponsor in Creating a Project Management Culture



Abstract:

Your organization has decided to transform itself into a project-based business. Everyone is excited about the prospect of doing so, but there’s one big problem: no one knows where to begin. The boss calls you in, and given the stellar work you’ve done through the years in project management, appoints you as the sponsor of the effort. She’s convinced you’re the person for the job, yet she hasn’t provided you with one good idea as to how to get things going. All you know is it needs to be done “tomorrow.” Yet, you realize that turning an organization into a project-based enterprise means changing beliefs, beliefs that have been inculcated and reinforced over many years of practice. As you scan through the listings on Amazon the only books that appear have been written by anthropologists, or are so general in their treatment of change that they’re basically useless. Mission impossible? It depends on how you go about it.

J. LeRoy Ward will present a three-pronged approach to change that ESI has developed over the many years it has assisted some of the world’s largest corporations, both here and abroad, as they have transformed themselves into project based businesses. This is a pragmatic and practical discussion, with plenty of tips to get you started. If you’re looking for theory, go read a 700-page book on project management by one of the “gurus” in the business. If you want answers, please join LeRoy for an informative discussion.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Henry C. Will IV, PMP

Bio:
Henry C. Will, IV, PMP is a Director of Business Solutions at Computer Horizons Corporation in East Hanover, NJ where he works in the Solutions division helping companies implement eBusiness within their enterprises. In his position, he mentors several project managers who manage projects valued in the millions of dollars. Involved in project management for over 20 years, he has managed about $10 million worth of successful projects that include a business-to-business solution for Guaranteed Overnight Delivery (G.O.D.) in Port Newark as well as the first binding Internet election for the Arizona Democratic Primary which was done in seven weeks with a fixed completion date.

Mr. Will is named on patents granted for work he did on a Blood Chemistry Analyzer for veterinarians that have been used throughout the world (patents 5,089,229, 5,250,262 and 5,336,467). In the past, he has managed software development on such varied projects as Y2K for AT&T, the F/A 18 Fighter / Attack plane, the A/V-8B Vertical Take-off and Landing jump jet and video games. He is a graduate of NJIT with a B.A. in Computer and Information Science.

Mr. Will is also active volunteering as a trustee for the Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association and is a licensed “E” level soccer coach.

Topic:

Project Management in the Midst of Chaos



Abstract:

  • The essentials of managing in a rapid environment
  • Getting the project back on track (or keeping it on track)
 Industry measurements tell us that a high percentage of projects are unsuccessful. The rapid rate of change in business dictates increasingly quicker time to market, exponential increases in communications and heightened demands. Scope creep, disconnected communications, lack of time to plan for (and respond to) changing requirements, and lower quality deliverables are the results. In fact, The Standish Group published research in 1994 showing that 31.1% of projects are canceled before they are completed and 52.7% of projects will cost 189% of their original estimates.

This presentation will discuss how many projects get to the point of being off track and out of control. Practical ideas will be presented on how to bring projects back into control, such as "shortcuts" to Project Management (PM): how to get the minimal amount of PM done in the least amount of time; how to reduce churn; and how to prioritize the many elements of the PM process. Techniques for risk management, issue tracking, efficient communications, war room, increasing team productivity, handling long hours and more will also be discussed.

PMINJ
              Symposium

William H Willson FRICS MAPM MIVM

Bio:
Will Willson FRICS, MAPM, MIVM is a Senior Operations Director and Manger of Risk and Value Management for Faithful&Gould USA, a member on the W.S. Atkins Group of Companies. Will relocated to USA with his family from UK in August last year and is now based in the Princeton office in NJ.

After an initial grounding in Quantity Surveying Will moved into Project Management concentrating in Landfill reclamation, Retail and in the completion of commercial developments following receiverships working for Funders. He then moved to the Channel Tunnel Rail Link Project where he spent over 6 years holding a number of key roles including Project Planning Manager, Risk, Trend, and Change Control Manager. Will then established a specialist risk and value management team in Faithful&Gould drawing on expertise throughout the UK and Overseas. The multi disciplinary team has now completed over 300 separate Risk / Value workshops and associated studies in virtually all sectors of the construction industry. Will is now challenged with extending the specialist consultancy risk and value management team in the USA working alongside W.S. Atkins engineering arm in America, Atkins Benham.

Topic:

Commercial Risk Management

Abstract:

Too often as Project Managers we keep risk to ourselves. Good proactive visible risk management will allow the early release of Contingency. Holding onto contingency is against good business principles because it denies opportunity to invest elsewhere and encourages the team to take their foot off the gas pedal and relax if there is plenty of spare cash available. When the risk has passed, remaining contingency should go back to the center. That’s big money tied up on a large project or portfolio of projects! Conversely, where risk is poorly managed, early cover ups hoping that things will get better often lead to a roller coast ride as the situation deteriorates and every one runs for cover and by that time the last thing a Project Manager wants are the risks identified that they have not managed!!

The presentation will introduce through reference to recent real life examples how Businesses can use Risk Management techniques to better manage their project delivery portfolio.


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