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PMINJ 2003 Symposium Speakers

17th Annual Symposium

05 May 2003

Edison - Pines Manor

Introduction
Agenda
Speakers
Posters
Sponsors
Photos


Speakers


Speaker Topic
Keynote Speakers
Dr. Christopher M. Avery
Survival Skills for Project Team Leaders
Mark Queen
Countdown®: A Strategy Game for Project Teams
David Pearce Snyder
Project Managers in Revolutionary Times
Track Speakers
Luc Audet & Janet McEwan
The Power of Project Interdependency Management
Ernest Baker, PMP
Communication and Negotiation Techniques that Work
Dave Davis, PMP
PM Practices According to Meatloaf
Joe Duquette & Charlene McMahon & Charlie Rothrock
A Risk Tool for Risky Businesses
Jerry Hill, PMP
Establishing a Complete PMO
David Hulett, Ph.D.
Executive Risk Management
Martha Legare
Creating at Warp Speed
Thomas Laudise, Esq & Leonard Nuara, Esq & Nancy Saunders
Improving the Odds of Project Success
Ted Leeman
Premium Blend: Training Media and the Perfect Mix
Joe Lukas, PE, PMP, CCE
It Works! Risk Management on IT Projects
Patti Petry, PMP
Are We Having Fun Yet?
Carol Rauh Ph.D., PMP
Stakeholder Analysis & Communication Plan Development
Dr. Aaron Shenhar
Strategic Project Leadership(TM)
Karen Sinclair, B.Soc.Sc, M.Sc.
Project Leadership in the 2nd Millennium
Ann Tomalavage, P.E., PMP
Turning Engineers into PM’s

PMINJ
              Symposium
Luc Audet

Bio:
 
Luc Audet, an experienced member of the Canadian Forces, is now a civilian member of the Department of National Defense (DND) with many years of project management experience. Appointed as the first Interdependency Manager for DND, Luc has brought the practice from inception to full implementation and is a key member of the Department’s Project Delivery Management team.  Luc holds Bachelors degrees in Science and Education from Collège Militaire Royale and Université d’Ottawa respectively.

 
speaker

Janet McEwan

Bio:
 
Janet McEwan is a seasoned professional with an accomplished track record in executive management, project management and consulting. She is an Associate Director with Fujitsu Consulting where she specializes in project delivery management as well as benefits realizations and investment value management, which assist organizations in maximizing the business value of their investments. Prior to joining Fujitsu Consulting, she spent more than eighteen years at the Bank of Canada, Canada’s Central Bank, where she held project management, line management and senior officer positions within the Information Management, Public Debt and Corporate Services areas.

Topic:

The Power of Project Interdependency Management


Abstract:

Do you know where all your projects are?  Will they bring home the things you expect, when you expect them?  Has your project slipped because another didn’t deliver a capability as required?  Few projects are self-sufficient and project managers seldom have control over everything needed for successful delivery.  Canada’s Department of National Defense (DND) has created a performance-based Interdependency Management practice to address this common dilemma.

Contrary to the opinion of some project managers, no project is an island unto itself.  Like it or not, most projects depend on other projects or initiatives to deliver some enabling capabilities that are essential to their successful implementation.  Most also contribute some enabling capabilities to other projects or initiatives.  The trick is to get all this “enabling” coordinated to minimize schedule slippage, reduce solution conflict, and prevent duplication of effort so that overall portfolio performance is optimized.  Interdependency Management takes a performance-based approach to this coordination challenge.

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              Symposium

Dr. Christopher M. Avery

Bio:
Dr. Christopher M. Avery, advises business leaders on human performance. He serves professionals and executives world-over who must get things done when sharing responsibility with others over whom they have no direct control.  Christopher authored Teamwork Is an Individual Skill: Getting Your Work Done When Sharing Responsibility, (Berrett-Koehler, April 2001), and publishes the digital TeamWisdom Tips read by professionals in more than 50 countries.  Through his firm Partnerwerks, Inc. Christopher’s ideas benefit executive management, organizational design, joint ventures, project management, collaborative commerce, mergers and acquisitions, R&D consortia, knowledge management, and supply chain management.  Project managers attending a recent presentation commented, “Dr. Avery forever altered my view of team relationships. A huge, ‘ah-ha’ “! “Great information that I can use in business and in my personal life”. “Fantastic”! “Most memorable presentation of the conference”.  Christopher earned his Ph.D in Organizational Communication from the University of Texas in 1989.

Topic:

Survival Skills for Project Team Leaders

Abstract:

Let’s face it, the best technical project management tools in the world never overcome the people problems bogging down project teams. Christopher Avery has tailored a nuts-and-bolts survival kit based on his best tactics for rapidly diagnosing trust in teams.  He will explore developing a trustworthy reputation; building trust; losing it; making, keeping and breaking agreements; and cleaning-up after yourself when you’ve been human and made “relationship-mistakes.” He’ll tell you about the biggest mistake you can make when crafting a common goal for your project team (and how to avoid it).  He’ll uncover the secret to knowing when your team is built — or not — and what to do when it isn’t.

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Ernest Baker, PMP

Bio:
Ernest Baker, PMP is the Vice President, Learning Solutions at AlphaNet Solutions, Inc., a Boston University Education Affiliate, headquartered in Cedar Knolls, NJ.  With over 19 years experience in corporate training and development, he has provided a variety of services to his clients, from developing new systems or programs to regional and national rollouts of new technology.  He has worked on a variety of IT development and infrastructure projects as well as a number of Training & Development projects for a number of Fortune 1000 companies.  Over the past 10 years, he has worked on projects for clients such as Mercedes-Benz USA, IBM, Hoffman-La Roche, Johnson & Johnson, PSE&G, and Exxon, as well as a number of internal development projects.  Prior to entering the corporate world, Ernie served as an Engineer Officer in the US Army Reserves, serving as a Project Manager for various military Civil and Combat Engineering projects.  His last assignment was as a Commanding Officer for a Combat Engineering Company and held the rank of Captain, USAR.  Ernie is a Certified Technical Trainer (CTT+ - 1998), and a certified IT Project Manager (IT Project +  - 2000).  In 2001, he was awarded certification by the Project Management Institute as a “Project Management Professional” (PMP).  In February, 2003, Ernie became a certified Microsoft Solutions Framework (MSF) Practitioner.

Topic:

Communication and Negotiation Techniques that Work

Abstract:

Several prominent studies have pinpointed poor communication as a major contributor to project failure.  Project Managers are tasked to communicate in multiple directions, both detailed and summary information, and to internal and external stakeholders in a timely and efficient manner. Yet, they often fail in the simplest forms of communication – person-to-person!  This presentation will introduce several tools to assist the Project Manager in understanding and delivering concise and clear messages.  Through the use of these tools, one can drill down to the core message and unearth the details hidden in our assumptions and perceptions to clearly express our ideas and understand one another.  Samples of the tools and their use will be illustrated through case studies and examples.

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              Symposium

Dave Davis, PMP

Bio:
Dave Davis is a certified PMP and has been actively involved in the science of project management the last 20 years.    He has a breadth of experience in many areas of project management and is currently creating the Program Office for the AT&T Business to Business Integration Services organization.  He has managed projects ranging from small internal efforts to multi-million dollar supply chain integration projects.  Besides a PMP, Dave holds two master’s degrees including a MBA from Xavier University.  He is the charter sponsor of the Western Lake Erie Chapter of the Project Management Institute, a member of the Board of directors in the PMI eBusiness special interest group (SIG), he has published many articles, and delivered presentations at professional conferences as well as the PMI international conference.

Topic:

PM Practices According to Meatloaf

Abstract:

In the late 1970's and even up to today, a rock singer named Meatloaf had several hit songs regarding the perils of life.  This session will use some of the philosophy presented in those songs and compare them to the daily life of a project manger.  This presentation will look at signs that signal the problem is approaching, ways to avoid it, ways to know when you're in trouble, ways to minimize the damage, and ways to survive after the fact.  This presentation will provide small examples of different situations within the day of a project manager and address it accordingly.  This presentation has messages represented in a frame work that combines years of experience with the daily life of a Project Manager.  Includes tips on identifying, avoiding, managing, surviving these perils. Included: "Paradise by the Dashboard Light" - project startup; "I'll Do Anything for Love, But I won't do That" - change control; "Two out of Three Ain't Bad" - expectations; and others.

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              Symposium
Joe Duquette

Bio:
 
Joe Duquette, has over thirty years experience in progressive leadership roles covering a wide range of finance, operations, systems engineering, process improvement, and program management.  Joe grew to senior management through hands-on experience from the analysts level through the director level of both the financial and program management areas for government and industry.  He has extensive experience in management of multi-functional organizations, strong team building and personnel management skills. His creative planning has resulted in significant improvement in organization operation or transition of organizational elements to new environments.  He has broad knowledge of both government and industrial approaches to financial and program management. Joe is currently a senior member of MITRE’s Economic and Decision Analysis Center. His efforts over the past two years have been devoted to system engineering process improvement and the adoption of the CMMI as a process improvement framework for MITRE’s Air Force Center. Joe is a retired Lieutenant Colonel with 20+ years of active duty. He has a BA in Mathematics from the State University of New York, a BS in Meteorology from the University of California and an MBA from the University of Montana.

 
speaker

Charlene McMahon

Bio:
 
Charlene J. McMahon is a Lead Economic / Business Analyst for the Economic and Decision Analysis Center at The MITRE Corporation.  In this position she provides acquisition support to Department of Defense programs. For the past ten years she has worked in risk management in some capacity.  This support has ranged from corporate knowledge base collection, environmental, safety and health acquisition metric and cost analysis, to risk management process and tool development and implementation for a critical large-scale government program.  She holds a B.S. in Resource Economics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and an M.S. in Information System Engineering, from Northeastern University.

 
speaker

Charlie Rothrock

Bio:
 
Charlie Rothrock, Chief Engineer – Wyatt Program, is currently employed by the MITRE Corporation and is providing project management and engineering support to the Federal government in the areas of IT and communications. Prior to being employed by MITRE, Mr. Rothrock has held marketing, operations and engineering positions for AT&T; management and communications consulting assignments for EDS; and project management and business development positions in the call center business for the Teletech Corporation based in Denver, Colorado.  Mr. Rothrock’s educational background includes a B.S. in Business Management from the University of Maryland, graduate level electrical engineering and computer science program taught by Stevens Institute and a Master Certificate in Project Management from George Washington University.

Topic:

A Risk Tool for Risky Businesses

Abstract:

A discussion of the implementation of a risk management process and RiskNav® tool for the Air Force and other government programs.  This presentation identifies the process that fostered the transition from stove-piped programs with occasional PowerPoint slides identifying program risks to a formal risk management program (sharing of risk information) integrated into on-going program activities.  RiskNav® is a prototype developed by MITRE to facilitate the risk process and help program managers manage their risk space. RiskNav lets you collect, analyze, prioritize, monitor, and visualize risk information in a collaborative fashion. RiskNav provides the ability to view the consequence, probability, and the status of managing each risk, in a single space.

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Jerry Hill, PMP

Bio:
Jerry Hill is Vice President of Technical Services and Support at ESI.  He joined ESI in1993, and has served as an instructor, senior consultant, and director of consulting programs.  His management responsibilities include consulting product design and development, technical solution delivery and client engagement management, business and technical research, and development and implementation of ESI’s knowledge management system.  Mr. Hill has conceived and constructed processes and methods that have enabled Fortune 100 and other client organizations to realize maximum benefit from their investment in project management.  He has worked extensively with executives and managers at all levels to design and deploy targeted project management practice solutions.  Mr. Hill led the team that developed ProjectFRAMEWORK®, a comprehensive model that enables organizations to define current capability and to reliably chart their course to full project management maturity.  He continued his work as the designer of the ProjectFOCUS® Project Management Methodology, which offers a consistent and complete project management approach across projects of all sizes, types, and levels of complexity.  Mr. Hill is also the chief architect of other ESI consulting products and technical solution models, to include: ProjectFLAGSHIP®, Project Management Office Model, ProjectPORTFOLIO®, Strategic Project Integration Model, and ProjectLAUNCH™, Project Planning Workshop.  Mr. Hill holds a master's degree in human resources management/ organization development from Pepperdine University and a bachelor's degree in applied mathematics from North Carolina State University.  He is a Project Management Professional (PMP), and he attended the Advanced Management Program for executives at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business.

Topic:

Establishing a Complete PMO

Abstract:

Organizations at various levels of project management capability and individual project management competency are closely examining the project management office (PMO) as an operating function improvement mechanism.  For some organizations, the PMO will facilitate the introduction of project management standards, tools, and practices, and will guide and influence activities within the project management environment.  For other organizations, the PMO will lead efforts to ensure that project management and business practices are integrated and consistently applied across the enterprise to achieve strategic business objectives.  Each organization must deliberate its own current need for a PMO.  This presentation will begin with an overview of project management office (PMO) design and purpose concepts.  It will then consider a competency continuum that describes five stages of a PMO structure—from a simple project office to an organizational center of excellence—that can be adapted for organizational use.  Participants also will review a comprehensive list of roles and responsibilities that can be introduced to serve the PMO’s business integration needs.  Then, there will be an examination of the 20 primary functions of a PMO, with individual consideration and discussion of those PMO functions that are applicable to their organizational needs.  Finally, they will identify some prevalent attributes of project management maturity that can result from successful PMO implementation.  This program will allow participants to examine both the strategic deliberation requirements and the practical design concepts needed to implement a centralized capability for project management oversight, control and support within an organization.

PMINJ
              Symposium
David Hulett, Ph.D.

Bio:
David Hulett consults in project risk analysis and management through his firm, Hulett & Associates, LLC of Los Angeles.  His clients have included companies in many commercial industries and aerospace and defense, as well as US Government agencies.  He focuses on qualitative and quantitative technical, cost and schedule risk analysis and on project scheduling.  With the Project Management Institute Risk Management SIG, Dr. Hulett was project manager for the revision of Chapter 11, the Risk Management chapter of the PMBOK® Guide that was published in 2000.  He is a member of the core committee to revise the PMBOK® Guide for 2003.  He served as a Director for Region II in the first year of the RM SIG’s existence and currently serves as Director of Technology Development.   Dr. Hulett has presented papers on cost and schedule risk analysis to many professional societies including PMI (European Project Management conferences in Jerusalem (2000), London (2001) and Cannes (2002) and chapters in Orange County, Los Angeles, San Diego, Los Alamos and New Jersey chapters), INCOSE and AACE.  He presents annually at the conference of the Integrated Project Management College (IPM) of PMI.  He has presented papers on project risk analysis at the Primavera Users Conference, Palisade User Conference and the INCOSE-RMSIG joint risk management conference.  He has recently published papers in the Project Management Journal and PM Network on project risk analysis.  He has held strategic planning positions at TOSCO and TRW.  In the Federal government, Dr. Hulett managed offices in the Federal Energy Agency, Department of Energy and the Office of Management and Budget.  He taught economics as an Instructor at Harvard University.  His Ph.D. is from Stanford and B.A. from Princeton.

Topic:

Executive Risk Management

Abstract:

Executives do not need to know the six PMBOK Guide risk management processes, but they do need to know that answers to the following questions:
  • What can risk management do for the organization? – Improve performance!
  • What happens if I do not deal with risk? – Increase the probability of failure!
  • How can I make risk management successful in my organization? – Commitment!
  • What are some of the barriers to successful risk management? – Lack of understanding!
  • What should I do first? – Champion the effort!
This presentation explores the answers to these questions in terms that you can use to help your executives appreciate, support, and leverage effective project risk management practices.

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Martha Legare

Bio:
Martha Legare has been consultant, coach and trainer to Fortune 500 industries for nineteen years. As CEO of the Gantt Group, inc., she is a member of the Project Management Institute’s Registered Education Provider Advisory Group and mediator for the American Arbitration Association. Martha has designed and delivered numerous seminars and developed Project Offices in the US, Mexico and Europe.  Prior to founding the Gantt Group, she attended John F. Kennedy University’s MBA program while being a principal in a San Francisco Bay Area organization development consulting firm. Martha’s management experience includes serving as a general manager of a leading manufacturer and establishing a retail business where she increased the initial investment by 16,667% in 3 years. Martha is an innately strategic thinker with strong cross-cultural skills and a steadfast commitment to improving the success of clients’ businesses.

Topic:

Creating at Warp Speed

Abstract:

This presentation is a case study of an international virtual project team that experiences an extraordinary leap in creativity and productivity by adopting an innovative web-enabled, visually based planning and communications platform.  Conferencing technology enabled the team to achieve effective interpersonal communications and creative project development while working in a time pressured project environment.  Combining aspects of colorful visual project maps with branches, linkages and hyperlinks, the technology also uses communication icons to accelerate the feedback and learning processes while developing a common project language.  The technology offers a viable process for teams that want to “work faster and smarter, not harder.”

PMINJ
              Symposium
Thomas Laudise, Esq

Bio:
 
Thomas Laudise is an attorney at the law firm of Thacher Proffitt whose practice is focused on transactional matters involving intellectual property, information technology, internet and e-commerce.  He has counseled clients, negotiated and drafted agreements and been involved in litigation on a host of technology-related matters including technology acquisition and licensing, domain name disputes, restrictive covenants, copyright infringement, trademarks, alternative dispute resolution, e-commerce, internet/website issues, privacy policy, and co-branding/affiliate agreements. Mr. Laudise received his J.D. in 1987 from Rutgers University School of Law in Newark. While at Rutgers, he was Articles Editor of the Rutgers Computer and Technology Journal and a legal writing teaching assistant. Mr. Laudise also received his M.B.A. degree from Seton Hall University in 1983 and a B.S. degree with a double major in mathematics and Computer Science from the College of William and Mary in 1980. Prior to becoming an attorney, Mr. Laudise worked as a software systems analyst for a major insurance company. His work there included application and system design, coding and implementation. He also provided technical, management and end user support for all phases of application development.

 
speaker

Leonard Nuara, Esq

Bio:
 
Leonard T. Nuara, is Chair of the firm of Thacher Proffitt's Technology and Intellectual Property Practice Group and specializes in the areas of intellectual property and information technology matters. His practice includes representing vendors and purchasers of computer and communications systems and services. He regularly handles transactions including the negotiation of license and development agreements for emerging technology companies, as well as transactions for established companies acquiring or outsourcing information technology assets and services. He is also an experienced trial lawyer in the fields of licensing disputes, misappropriation of trade secrets, copyright and trademark infringement and anti-competition matters, with a particular emphasis on information systems and internet businesses.  Since 1986, Mr. Nuara has been an Adjunct Professor of Law at Seton Hall University School of Law in Newark, New Jersey. He teaches various courses in Computer Law. In 1996, he became an Adjunct Professor for Seton Hall University Graduate School of Business, offering a Computer Law course for the M.B.A. program.   A nationally recognized lecturer about legal matters related to computer technology, Mr. Nuara is also on the advisory and editorial boards of various technology publications, including the Bureau of National Affair's Computer Law Reporter, Glasser Legal Work's Cyberspace Lawyer, Aspen Publishing's Licensing Journal, its E-Commerce Law Journal and its IP Litigator. Mr. Nuara is a monthly columnist for the Licensing Journal and is an annual contributing author for the Licensing Deskbook. He was Co-Chair and a contributing editor of the Intellectual Property section of the ABA's Achieving Legal Business Order in Cyberspace: A Report on Global Jurisdiction Issues Created by the Internet. He has also prepared the chapter on "Obscenity and the Internet" for the Aspen Law and Business treatise on The Law of the Internet.  Mr. Nuara graduated from Boston College cum laude in 1981, and from Seton Hall University School of Law in 1984. He is the Co-Chair of the Intellectual Property Sub-Committee for the Committee on Cyberspace Law for the Business Law Section of the American Bar Association, and is a member of the Litigation, Science and Technology, Intellectual Property, Torts and Insurance and Antitrust Sections. He is also the former Chair of the Public Relations Committee of the Computer Law Association.

 

Nancy Saunders

Bio:
 
Nancy Saunders is a Senior Consultant with M.F. Smith & Associates, Inc. with more than two decades of business experience.  During the last ten years she has been responsible for developing project management methodologies and tools as well as developing project management-related learning strategies and solutions for companies in the telecommunications and pharmaceutical industries.  Ms. Saunders current assignment focuses on utilizing project management techniques to manage the design and implementation of e-learning solutions in the financial service industry.  Prior to her project management focus, Ms. Saunders was the Product Manager of Training and System Engineering Services for a Network Systems Integration company.  Ms. Saunders holds a B.A. in Psychology from Kean University and a Master’s Certification in Business Administration from William Paterson University.  She has been an active member of the NJ Chapter of PMI since 1996.

Topic:

Improving the Odds of Project Success

Abstract:

Are the budgets for your projects getting tighter each year?  Are you nervous about your future based on the success rate of your current project?  If so, then one way to increase your project’s probability for success is to monitor project risk more closely and to unearth potential risks that you have not previously considered.  One area worthy of a closer look is the attorney responsible for negotiating your project’s contract(s).  Whether your attorney is a member of in-house counsel staff for a Fortune 500 company or hired to represent your interests as project consultant he/she can have a large impact on the procurement and client negotiation of your project.  Some questions to consider include:  Have you ever met your project’s attorney?  Are you on the attorney review list for your project?  How much project management knowledge does your attorney have?  Does your attorney understand the Project Manager’s needs in the procurement of products and services for the project and are they clearly represented in your third party contracts?  If not, then through the use of specific examples and several role-playing scenarios this presentation will enhance your ability in these critical areas.  We will improve your ability to identify and manage project risk by providing you with an understanding of contracting and negotiation principles.  These principles will help you to work effectively with the project’s attorney so that a third party contract is itself an effective project management tool.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Ted Leeman

Bio:
Mr. Leemann has over twenty years of management experience in the public and private sectors with particular emphasis on project management and strategic planning. He is a recognized expert in course development including requirement determination, curricula design, and instructor course presentation skills.  Mr. Leemann has developed and presented training to thousands of students in the telecommunications, automated information services industries and government.  His experience also includes the college campus where he developed and taught programs on business subjects such as quality control, time management and process redesign.  Mr. Leemann has presented training courses around the world receiving laudatory endorsements from diverse student groups. Recent speaking engagements include the Software Technology Conference 2000, as well as ASTD (American Society for Training and Development) 2001, The Maryland Techway Conference 2001, the American Institute of Architects Annual Symposium 2001, US Army Medical Research Commanders’ Conference March 2002, and US Army Community Commander Conference July 2002.  He recently contributed an article to the April 2001 Design and Build Magazine and has recently been interviewed for United Airlines Sky Radio and for articles in Projects At Work Magazine March 2002 and January 2003.

Topic:

Premium Blend: Training Media and the Perfect Mix

Abstract:

Today, there is a wealth of opportunities for project managers to continue their professional education.  Just as sources of learning have multiplied over the past 5 years, so have, overwhelmingly it seems, the media used for delivering education: CD-ROMs, synchronous learning, asynchronous, self-paced, instructor-led…and many more. This presentation is for those who ask: “How can I make sense of it all?” , “What is my learning style?” , “What does the latest research show?”, “Where can I find assessments or other tools to help select the best approach?”, or “What’s the best approach for training my project team?”  In this interactive presentation, Mr. Ted Leemann will present answers to these questions; define the terms used in learning delivery methods; simplify the options available by illustrating advantages and disadvantages; and provide concise tools and resources for tailoring learning based on individual learning styles and work environments.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Joe Lukas PMP, PE, CCE

Bio:
Joe is currently the Industrial Business Segment Leader for the Bergmann Associates Eastern Region.  Bergmann Associates is a full-service engineering firm with multiple offices including Hoboken, East Windsor and Philadelphia.  Joe is a Chemical Engineer from Syracuse University, and has been involved in project management for over 20 years.  He has worked in engineering, manufacturing, construction, project controls, estimating and contracting. Joe has also been a Program and Project Manager supporting worldwide programs. His project management experience spans product development, capital and IT/IS projects.  Joe joined PMI in 1984 and has held numerous Chapter offices including President of the Rochester Chapter.  Joe has written over 20 articles on project management topics, and is a frequent guest speaker on project management subjects for organizations and companies across the Northeast.  Joe is also an instructor and consultant on project management topics including project planning, earned value, risk management, negotiating, and project management best practices.

Topic:

It Works! Risk Management on IT Projects

Abstract:

This presentation will provide ideas to apply risk management to your projects!  This presentation will describe the successful use of risk management on an information systems (IS) project to create a new worldwide project portfolio management system (CMS) for a Fortune 500 company. This talk will discuss the specific risk identification techniques used by the project team.  The team used qualitative risk analysis to better understand the potential of each risk event.  The scales used to assign a value for probability and risk impact for each risk event will be reviewed.  Using these numbers, an expected value was calculated to determine which risk events warranted specific risk response planning.  This presentation will cover the risk response planning done as part of the project plan.  For all major risks, mitigation and contingency plans were prepared. The talk will conclude with a discussion on the use of risk monitoring and control on the project.  Actual risk events that occurred on the project will be described, along with the responses by the team. The final project results will be compared to the project plan to show how the team did, and how use of risk management helped the team.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Patti Petry, PMP

Bio:
Patti Petry, a Senior Program Manager at Hewlett-Packard, has over twenty years of project experience in the computer field, with fifteen of those years in management.  She has worked on both commercial and government projects in the US, and for the last three years, has been focusing on international programs.  Currently a member of Consulting and Integration Division at HP, Patti is driving several initiatives focused on business excellence in Europe and Asia.  Patti received her PMP certification in 1998.

Topic:

Are We Having Fun Yet?

Abstract:

We often hear top management telling us to work hard, make our goals, reach those numbers, and have fun.  What exactly does this mean?  If a team member enjoys the work and does it well, is this fun enough? What more is needed? In my last twenty years of working and managing software development and integration projects, having fun has played an important part of helping a team learn to work together smoothly and value each other. Drawing from my past experiences, I'll talk about some of the fun activities and the importance to the projects.  This will include an array of contests and outings along with some do's and don'ts.  Overall, I’ll focus on how a project manager helps his team have fun while getting the job done.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Mark Queen

Bio:
Mark B. Queen is a senior consultant for Paradigm Learning. Paradigm Learning is a dynamic employee training and communications organization specializing in the design of innovative discovery learning programs through games and simulations. Mark has more than 20 years’ experience in various aspects of financial and service organizations. He was a member of the Malcolm Bridge award-winning AT&T Universal Card Services in 1992 and was responsible for delivering the quality story to more than 50 organizations throughout the United States. Mark is a graduate of Wake Forest University with a bachelor’s degree in economics.

Topic:

Countdown®: A Strategy Game for Project Teams

Abstract:

Paradigm Learning will expose participants to a high-energy business simulation: Countdown:  A Strategy Game for Project Teams. This live simulation has been implemented by organizations such as Delta Airlines, Intel, Caterpillar and other major corporations, and plunges teams of learners into the thick of a mission-critical project.  Participants experience game-like fun and real life challenges.  In short, they experience the demands of working on a project team and discover the elements of project success.  Conferees will be able to experience elements of a business simulation that is successfully helping organizations deliver project management knowledge as well as enjoy revisiting some of the basics that are critical to project management success.

In this 45 minute segment, we will be focusing on behaviors involved in participating in, managing and controlling a project --communicating effectively, gaining and managing commitment, and resolving conflict - within the team, within the organization, and outside the organization.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Carol Rauh Ph.D., PMP

Bio:
Dr. Carol Rauh has 25 years of experience managing high technology projects and government research grants.  She has made significant contributions to corporate project management training, methodology development and implementation, process definition, marketing, and mentoring.  Now a Senior Consultant with ESI International, Dr. Rauh specializes in establishing and managing Project Management Offices, focusing on defining and implementing project management processes and practices into corporate organizations.  Prior, she worked in a technical capacity on many IT projects and headed a University Research Center focused on public policy analysis, development, and evaluation.  Dr. Rauh has a Ph.D. in Research Methods and Statistics from Rutgers University, where she also earned an M.A. degree in Policy Planning, Development, and Evaluation.  She received a Master’s Certificate in Project Management from The George Washington University and is certified by the Project Management Institute as a Project Management Professional (PMP).  She is currently a member of the PMBOK 2004 Core Update Team and serves as Co-Lead of the Knowledge Areas.  She is an affiliate faculty member in the graduate Project Management Program at Stevens Institute of Technology.  In addition, she actively participates in the New Jersey Chapter of PMI.

Topic:

Stakeholder Analysis & Communication Plan Development


Abstract:

Experienced Project Managers know how important communication is to project success.  In a study done by Harold Kerzner, Ph.D., 90% of projects that failed did so not because they failed to have a detailed WBS, not because they didn’t monitor and track their project, and not because they used the “wrong” project management software or failed to use any other “hard” technique.  The projects failed because of soft factors – lack of teamwork, lack of political savvy, and lack of good project communication.

According to CFO Magazine, 41 percent of all business capital is spent on Information Technology.  This shift to an Information Age economy created a huge demand for knowledge workers.  Many knowledge workers become Project Managers.  Yet critical soft skills are generally not part of our education.  How many of you learned soft skills in school?  So a key question for is:  How can Project Managers hone the soft skills that are essential for project success?

This presentation will focus on communication, specifically, communication planning.  We will review what goes into a project’s communications plan, along with a number of key communication techniques.  We’ll discuss how to perform stakeholder analysis, followed by a hands-on example of using stakeholder analysis to identify strategies for approaching and communicating with project stakeholders.  Attendees will leave the presentation equipped with communication planning skills they can immediately apply to their projects.

speaker

Dr. Aaron Shenhar

Bio:
Dr. Aaron J. Shenhar is a world leader in project management and technology management scholarship, a consultant, lecturer, and teacher. He is the Institute Professor of Management and the founder of the project management program at Stevens Institute of Technology. He is also a visiting professor at Tel-Aviv University and the Technion in Israel. He was named, “Engineering Manager of the Year” by the Engineering Management Society of the IEEE in 2000. Prior to his academic career, he has been involved in managing projects, innovation, R&D, and high technology businesses for over 20 years. Working for the Israel defense industry, he participated in all phases of engineering and management -- from project manager through the highest executive posts. As executive at Rafael, the Armament Development Authority of Israel, he was appointed Corporate Vice President, Human Resources, and later, President of the Electronic Systems Division. Dr. Shenhar's current work focuses on research, teaching, and consulting in project management, strategic project leadership, technology and innovation management, product development, and the leadership of professionals in technology-based organizations. He is serving as a consultant to major corporations such as 3M, Honeywell, Trane, US Army, Compaq Computer, BMG Entertainment, Lockheed Martin, and Israel Aircraft Industry. With more than 150 publications to his credit, his writings have influenced technology management research and education throughout the world. Dr. Shenhar holds five academic degrees in engineering, statistics, and management, including a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University.

Topic:

Strategic Project Leadership(TM)

Abstract:

Strategic Project Leadership(TM) is a new approach to project management that focuses projects on creating competitive advantage and winning in the marketplace. It is based on the realization that project management in the 21st century will be completely different than it has been in the last fifty years. In the more traditional approach, project managers and teams were typically focused on getting the job done, and meeting time and budget goals. Strategic Project Leadership(TM), or SPL, provides a more modern and wider view. It suggests that projects are done for business results, and that just ‘getting the job done’ is not enough. This presentation will provide a mindset, a framework, and a practical, step-by-step approach on how to connect project management to business results and how to turn projects into powerful competitive weapons. This approach is being implemented by leading organizations, and their business results will be presented.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Karen Sinclair, B.Soc.Sc, M.Sc.

Bio:
Karen Sinclair is a Business Systems Analyst and Project Leader.  She is also owner of SoftwarePlus Consulting Company and a past President of the Livingston NJ Chapter of Business Network International.  Karen holds a Bachelors degree in Management from the University of Guyana, and a Masters of Science degree in Business Systems Analysis and Design from the City University Business School in London, England.  She has over twenty years practical experience developing software for business, and combines this extensive business savvy with contemporary technical proficiency to provide consulting services to fortune 500 and other companies.

Topic:

Project Leadership in the 2nd Millennium


Abstract:

On every dimension, the environment of business has become transformed in a process that started before the end of the last millennium. In doing so, it has altered the relative importance of the different leadership techniques practiced by a successful team leader.  This presentation intends to show that to be successful, the team leader must be more of a generalist, adaptable to new technology, yet receptive to and cognizant of the innumerable specialists comprising today's business team.  It is based on the experience in the software development environment, which has seen critical changes in its role and application in society, its impact on the economy, its technical dimensions, and its material, cultural and social composition.

The presentation analyzes ten observed environmental factors in terms of their impacts on the job of project leadership.   It also highlights motivational skills needed to elicit the best from what is now a culturally diverse fabric in a technically dynamic environment, as well as, other soft skills demanded of today’s project managers.  A complete set of project leadership skills includes technical expertise with project management techniques and tools and the business savvy to know when and how to make use of them.  The inevitable conclusion contends that leadership, even in technically demanding projects, is still about people and responsiveness to the circumstances in which we find ourselves.

PMINJ
              Symposium

David Pearce Snyder

Bio:
David Pearce Snyder is Life Styles Editor of The Futurist magazine, and a data-based forecaster whose seminars and workshops on strategic thinking have been attended by representatives of most Fortune 500 companies.  Mr. Snyder has published over 100 studies, articles and reports on the future of a wide range of industries, institutions and professions, and on the socio-economic impacts of new technology.  He is Editor/Co-Author of five books, including Future Forces (1984) and America in the 1990’s (1992), and has appeared on Nightline, The Today Show, CNN and MSNBC.

Topic:

Project Managers in Revolutionary Times



Abstract:

As the classical Greeks first observed, “change ” is the only future certainty.  Fortunately, most significant change occurs at an incremental, manageable pace.  Periodically, however, the historic, background rate of change is accelerated by contemporary events.  America today is confronted by a tidal wave of new workplace technology, which is transforming how, where, when and with whom we will work in the 21st Century.  Futurist David Pearce Snyder will present an  “instant pre-play ” of the next 10 years in America, describing the applications of mature information technology, including “Frictionless Transactions”, “Smart Machines”, “Info-Mated Operations", “Grid ” computing, “Virtual Enterprises ” and “Communities of Practice,” that will dramatically alter the style, form and substance of project management in the decade ahead.

PMINJ
              Symposium

Ann Tomalavage, P.E., PMP

Bio:
Ann M. Tomalavage, P.E., PMP, has over 25 years of professional experience, and has been a practicing project manager since 1984.  Ann holds a B.S. and an M.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Delaware.  Ann is a registered professional engineer, and is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) .  Ann works with organizations and individuals who are frustrated by overrun projects, missed deadlines, and dissatisfied customers.  Ann’s specialty is helping technical personnel understand, embrace, and apply project management principles.  Ann also assists firms with strategizing, planning, and costing proposals, and facilitating project kick-off meetings.  She also helps organizations revamp their workflow.  Ann was Principal Project Manager at Roy F. Weston, Inc., where she managed millions of dollars’ worth of profitable environmental projects.  Ann was responsible for leading proposal efforts for small to large projects and programs.  She was also responsible for training and developing project managers at Weston, and she created a program for mentoring new project managers, to assist them in making the transition from strictly technical responsibilities to business and communications responsibilities.  Ann assisted new PMs in identifying skill gaps and helping to bridge the gaps through coaching and training.  She also led a project to develop a PM-friendly project information interface with the project accounting system.  Ann led a project management training and development engagement with General Services Administration (Region 3) in Philadelphia.  Ann has conducted seven project management training courses at Conrail for PMs from diverse backgrounds (engineering, risk management, finance, operations, information systems, administration, labor relations) and in remote locations.  Ann has also conducted PM training for an international pharmaceutical contract research organization (CRO), for the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, for the information systems department at a nationwide construction firm, and for a county in Pennsylvania.  Ann has trained over 1000 project managers since 1992.  Ann has taught project management at Penn State, Drexel and Villanova.  Ann is qualified to administer the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI).  She applies the MBTI to projects, including influencing and communicating with clients, peers, management, and project team members.

Topic:

Turning Engineers into PM’s



Abstract:

True or False?  The best engineers/programmers/accountants/scientists make the best project managers.
Yes or No?  Project leaders are born, not made.
Where do YOU get good leaders for your projects?
Can you develop outstanding project managers regardless of their background?
What skills do they need to be marvelous?
How do you transform them?
Do you need to be an alchemist?
What if you’re trying to make the transition yourself?
How can you do it more smoothly than your predecessors?
Do you need an alchemist?

Ann M. Tomalavage, P.E., PMP, was responsible for transforming engineers and scientists into project managers, when she was Principal Project Manager with a nationwide environmental consulting firm.  Ann’s job was to persuade these excellent technical people that budgets really DO matter, that understanding the contract type can inform how you manage a project, that people (team members, clients, the public, other stakeholders) really CAN make or break your project.  Now in private practice, Ann has helped software engineers, programmers, architects, nurses, doctors, accountants, and other technically trained people make the transition to project leader.  Ann will share what’s worked for her, and will invite you to share your challenges and successes with the group.


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